Photo-response of tobacco whitefly, Bemisia tabaci gennadius (hemiptera: Aleyrodidae), to light-emitting diodes

Min Gi Kim, Ji Yeon Yang, Namhyun Chung, Hoi Seon Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The photo-response of the tobacco whitefly to light-emitting diodes of four different wavelengths and various intensities was tested in an LED-equipped Y-maze chamber and compared with the response to black light (BL), which is typically used in commercial traps. The BL showed the highest attraction rate (90.3%) to Bemisia tabaci, followed by a similarly strong attraction to the blue LED (89.0%), the yellow LED (87.7%), the green LED (85.3%), and the red LED (84.3%). These results suggest that energy-efficient LEDs could be used for more environmentally friendly insect control.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)567-569
Number of pages3
JournalJournal of the Korean Society for Applied Biological Chemistry
Volume55
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012 Aug 1

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Hemiptera
Tobacco
Light emitting diodes
Light
Insect Control
Insect control
Wavelength

Keywords

  • attraction
  • Bemisia tabaci
  • light-emitting diodes
  • photo-response
  • power consumption

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Organic Chemistry

Cite this

Photo-response of tobacco whitefly, Bemisia tabaci gennadius (hemiptera : Aleyrodidae), to light-emitting diodes. / Kim, Min Gi; Yang, Ji Yeon; Chung, Namhyun; Lee, Hoi Seon.

In: Journal of the Korean Society for Applied Biological Chemistry, Vol. 55, No. 4, 01.08.2012, p. 567-569.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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