Pine sawdust biochar reduces GHG emission by decreasing microbial and enzyme activities in forest and grassland soils in a laboratory experiment

Prem Pokharel, Jin Hyeob Kwak, Yong Sik Ok, Scott X. Chang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study investigated the effects of biochar soil amendment on greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in soils. Pine (Pinus koraiensis Siebold & Zucc.) sawdust biochar was produced at 300 and 550 °C with and without steam activation (coded as BC300-S, BC550-S, BC300 and BC550, respectively). They were applied to forest and grassland soils at 1.5% (w/w) rate in a 100-day laboratory incubation experiment. Application of BC550 significantly reduced cumulative CO2 emission from the forest soil by 16.4% relative to the control (without biochar application), but not from the grassland soil. Biochar application did not have significant effects on CH4 uptake from either soil. Application of BC550 and BC550-S reduced the cumulative N2O emission by 27.5 and 31.5%, respectively, in the forest soil and 14.8 and 11.7%, respectively, in the grassland soil, as compared to the control. The effects of BC300 and BC300-S on cumulative CO2 and N2O emission was not significant in both soils, except for the significant reduction in cumulative N2O emission from the forest soil by BC300-S. The effect of BC550 and BC550-S on N2O emission persisted until the end of the 100-day incubation indicating possible long-term effects of these biochars. We conclude that BC550 and BC550-S had the highest potential to reduce CO2 and N2O emission in the 100-day laboratory incubation experiment. These biochars should be tested in long-term field trials to confirm their potential for mitigating CO2 and N2O fluxes in real ecosystems with a relevant time frame.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1247-1256
Number of pages10
JournalScience of the Total Environment
Volume625
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018 Jun 1

Fingerprint

Sawdust
grassland soil
Enzyme activity
Gas emissions
Greenhouse gases
forest soil
microbial activity
enzyme activity
greenhouse gas
Soils
Experiments
incubation
soil
soil amendment
laboratory experiment
sawdust
biochar
Steam
experiment
Ecosystems

Keywords

  • Biomass carbonization
  • Black carbon
  • Carbon sequestration
  • Charcoal
  • Slow pyrolysis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Engineering
  • Environmental Chemistry
  • Waste Management and Disposal
  • Pollution

Cite this

Pine sawdust biochar reduces GHG emission by decreasing microbial and enzyme activities in forest and grassland soils in a laboratory experiment. / Pokharel, Prem; Kwak, Jin Hyeob; Ok, Yong Sik; Chang, Scott X.

In: Science of the Total Environment, Vol. 625, 01.06.2018, p. 1247-1256.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{3d58e4c1ba5f439387938456c0058bed,
title = "Pine sawdust biochar reduces GHG emission by decreasing microbial and enzyme activities in forest and grassland soils in a laboratory experiment",
abstract = "This study investigated the effects of biochar soil amendment on greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in soils. Pine (Pinus koraiensis Siebold & Zucc.) sawdust biochar was produced at 300 and 550 °C with and without steam activation (coded as BC300-S, BC550-S, BC300 and BC550, respectively). They were applied to forest and grassland soils at 1.5{\%} (w/w) rate in a 100-day laboratory incubation experiment. Application of BC550 significantly reduced cumulative CO2 emission from the forest soil by 16.4{\%} relative to the control (without biochar application), but not from the grassland soil. Biochar application did not have significant effects on CH4 uptake from either soil. Application of BC550 and BC550-S reduced the cumulative N2O emission by 27.5 and 31.5{\%}, respectively, in the forest soil and 14.8 and 11.7{\%}, respectively, in the grassland soil, as compared to the control. The effects of BC300 and BC300-S on cumulative CO2 and N2O emission was not significant in both soils, except for the significant reduction in cumulative N2O emission from the forest soil by BC300-S. The effect of BC550 and BC550-S on N2O emission persisted until the end of the 100-day incubation indicating possible long-term effects of these biochars. We conclude that BC550 and BC550-S had the highest potential to reduce CO2 and N2O emission in the 100-day laboratory incubation experiment. These biochars should be tested in long-term field trials to confirm their potential for mitigating CO2 and N2O fluxes in real ecosystems with a relevant time frame.",
keywords = "Biomass carbonization, Black carbon, Carbon sequestration, Charcoal, Slow pyrolysis",
author = "Prem Pokharel and Kwak, {Jin Hyeob} and Ok, {Yong Sik} and Chang, {Scott X.}",
year = "2018",
month = "6",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.12.343",
language = "English",
volume = "625",
pages = "1247--1256",
journal = "Science of the Total Environment",
issn = "0048-9697",
publisher = "Elsevier",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Pine sawdust biochar reduces GHG emission by decreasing microbial and enzyme activities in forest and grassland soils in a laboratory experiment

AU - Pokharel, Prem

AU - Kwak, Jin Hyeob

AU - Ok, Yong Sik

AU - Chang, Scott X.

PY - 2018/6/1

Y1 - 2018/6/1

N2 - This study investigated the effects of biochar soil amendment on greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in soils. Pine (Pinus koraiensis Siebold & Zucc.) sawdust biochar was produced at 300 and 550 °C with and without steam activation (coded as BC300-S, BC550-S, BC300 and BC550, respectively). They were applied to forest and grassland soils at 1.5% (w/w) rate in a 100-day laboratory incubation experiment. Application of BC550 significantly reduced cumulative CO2 emission from the forest soil by 16.4% relative to the control (without biochar application), but not from the grassland soil. Biochar application did not have significant effects on CH4 uptake from either soil. Application of BC550 and BC550-S reduced the cumulative N2O emission by 27.5 and 31.5%, respectively, in the forest soil and 14.8 and 11.7%, respectively, in the grassland soil, as compared to the control. The effects of BC300 and BC300-S on cumulative CO2 and N2O emission was not significant in both soils, except for the significant reduction in cumulative N2O emission from the forest soil by BC300-S. The effect of BC550 and BC550-S on N2O emission persisted until the end of the 100-day incubation indicating possible long-term effects of these biochars. We conclude that BC550 and BC550-S had the highest potential to reduce CO2 and N2O emission in the 100-day laboratory incubation experiment. These biochars should be tested in long-term field trials to confirm their potential for mitigating CO2 and N2O fluxes in real ecosystems with a relevant time frame.

AB - This study investigated the effects of biochar soil amendment on greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in soils. Pine (Pinus koraiensis Siebold & Zucc.) sawdust biochar was produced at 300 and 550 °C with and without steam activation (coded as BC300-S, BC550-S, BC300 and BC550, respectively). They were applied to forest and grassland soils at 1.5% (w/w) rate in a 100-day laboratory incubation experiment. Application of BC550 significantly reduced cumulative CO2 emission from the forest soil by 16.4% relative to the control (without biochar application), but not from the grassland soil. Biochar application did not have significant effects on CH4 uptake from either soil. Application of BC550 and BC550-S reduced the cumulative N2O emission by 27.5 and 31.5%, respectively, in the forest soil and 14.8 and 11.7%, respectively, in the grassland soil, as compared to the control. The effects of BC300 and BC300-S on cumulative CO2 and N2O emission was not significant in both soils, except for the significant reduction in cumulative N2O emission from the forest soil by BC300-S. The effect of BC550 and BC550-S on N2O emission persisted until the end of the 100-day incubation indicating possible long-term effects of these biochars. We conclude that BC550 and BC550-S had the highest potential to reduce CO2 and N2O emission in the 100-day laboratory incubation experiment. These biochars should be tested in long-term field trials to confirm their potential for mitigating CO2 and N2O fluxes in real ecosystems with a relevant time frame.

KW - Biomass carbonization

KW - Black carbon

KW - Carbon sequestration

KW - Charcoal

KW - Slow pyrolysis

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85040124523&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85040124523&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.12.343

DO - 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.12.343

M3 - Article

C2 - 29996421

AN - SCOPUS:85040124523

VL - 625

SP - 1247

EP - 1256

JO - Science of the Total Environment

JF - Science of the Total Environment

SN - 0048-9697

ER -