Polymerization Mode of Self-Adhesive, Dual-Cured Dental Resin Cements Light Cured Through Various Restorative Materials

Ji Suk Shim, Jeong Kyung Kang, Nayansi Jha, Jae Jun Ryu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the polymerization mode of self-adhesive, dual-cured resin cements light-cured through overlying materials with different degree of translucency by measuring the degree of conversion (DC). Materials and Methods: Three kinds of self-adhesive, dual-cured resin cements (G-CEM LinkAceTM, Maxcem EliteTM, and BisCem®) were light-cured through three different restorative materials that included porcelain-fused metal (PFM), zirconia, and lithium disilicate. Polymerization kinetics were continuously evaluated using infrared spectroscopy after 0, 5, 10, and 30 min and 2 weeks of mixing. Data were statistically analyzed using two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), one-way ANOVA, and Tukey's multiple-comparison test (α = 0.05). Results: Regardless of the kind of resin cement, the light-cured groups showed higher DC than did the autopolymerization group under PFM at any point of time (p < 0.05). The time taken by the cements to achieve statistically similar DC between the zirconia and lithium disilicate groups increased in the following order: G-CEM LinkAceTM, BisCem®, and Maxcem EliteTM (p < 0.05). Conclusions: The degree of translucency of the restorative material can be a significant variable determining the polymerization aspects of self-adhesive, dual-cured resin cements. The resin cements light-cured through lithium disilicate and zirconia showed higher DC than that shown by cements cured under PFM at any measurement time. The lithium disilicate and zirconia groups showed differences in the early stage of polymerization for G-CEM LinkAceTM and BisCem®; however, the differences diminished at 2 weeks. CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE: Chemical polymerization is not sufficient to cause the resin cement to achieve the highest polymerization not only in early stage, but also in late stage of polymerization. The sensitivity to the intensity of the light was different for each resin cement. Special clinical steps to compensate for the attenuated light intensity seem to be necessary for the resin cements which are susceptible to light intensity. (J Esthet Restor Dent 29:209–214, 2017).

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)209-214
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Esthetic and Restorative Dentistry
Volume29
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017 May 1

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Synthetic Resins
Resin Cements
Dental Cements
Polymerization
Adhesives
Light
Dental Porcelain
Metals
Analysis of Variance
Spectrum Analysis
zirconium oxide
lithia disilicate

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dentistry(all)

Cite this

Polymerization Mode of Self-Adhesive, Dual-Cured Dental Resin Cements Light Cured Through Various Restorative Materials. / Shim, Ji Suk; Kang, Jeong Kyung; Jha, Nayansi; Ryu, Jae Jun.

In: Journal of Esthetic and Restorative Dentistry, Vol. 29, No. 3, 01.05.2017, p. 209-214.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the polymerization mode of self-adhesive, dual-cured resin cements light-cured through overlying materials with different degree of translucency by measuring the degree of conversion (DC). Materials and Methods: Three kinds of self-adhesive, dual-cured resin cements (G-CEM LinkAceTM, Maxcem EliteTM, and BisCem{\circledR}) were light-cured through three different restorative materials that included porcelain-fused metal (PFM), zirconia, and lithium disilicate. Polymerization kinetics were continuously evaluated using infrared spectroscopy after 0, 5, 10, and 30 min and 2 weeks of mixing. Data were statistically analyzed using two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), one-way ANOVA, and Tukey's multiple-comparison test (α = 0.05). Results: Regardless of the kind of resin cement, the light-cured groups showed higher DC than did the autopolymerization group under PFM at any point of time (p < 0.05). The time taken by the cements to achieve statistically similar DC between the zirconia and lithium disilicate groups increased in the following order: G-CEM LinkAceTM, BisCem{\circledR}, and Maxcem EliteTM (p < 0.05). Conclusions: The degree of translucency of the restorative material can be a significant variable determining the polymerization aspects of self-adhesive, dual-cured resin cements. The resin cements light-cured through lithium disilicate and zirconia showed higher DC than that shown by cements cured under PFM at any measurement time. The lithium disilicate and zirconia groups showed differences in the early stage of polymerization for G-CEM LinkAceTM and BisCem{\circledR}; however, the differences diminished at 2 weeks. CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE: Chemical polymerization is not sufficient to cause the resin cement to achieve the highest polymerization not only in early stage, but also in late stage of polymerization. The sensitivity to the intensity of the light was different for each resin cement. Special clinical steps to compensate for the attenuated light intensity seem to be necessary for the resin cements which are susceptible to light intensity. (J Esthet Restor Dent 29:209–214, 2017).",
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AU - Jha, Nayansi

AU - Ryu, Jae Jun

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N2 - Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the polymerization mode of self-adhesive, dual-cured resin cements light-cured through overlying materials with different degree of translucency by measuring the degree of conversion (DC). Materials and Methods: Three kinds of self-adhesive, dual-cured resin cements (G-CEM LinkAceTM, Maxcem EliteTM, and BisCem®) were light-cured through three different restorative materials that included porcelain-fused metal (PFM), zirconia, and lithium disilicate. Polymerization kinetics were continuously evaluated using infrared spectroscopy after 0, 5, 10, and 30 min and 2 weeks of mixing. Data were statistically analyzed using two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), one-way ANOVA, and Tukey's multiple-comparison test (α = 0.05). Results: Regardless of the kind of resin cement, the light-cured groups showed higher DC than did the autopolymerization group under PFM at any point of time (p < 0.05). The time taken by the cements to achieve statistically similar DC between the zirconia and lithium disilicate groups increased in the following order: G-CEM LinkAceTM, BisCem®, and Maxcem EliteTM (p < 0.05). Conclusions: The degree of translucency of the restorative material can be a significant variable determining the polymerization aspects of self-adhesive, dual-cured resin cements. The resin cements light-cured through lithium disilicate and zirconia showed higher DC than that shown by cements cured under PFM at any measurement time. The lithium disilicate and zirconia groups showed differences in the early stage of polymerization for G-CEM LinkAceTM and BisCem®; however, the differences diminished at 2 weeks. CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE: Chemical polymerization is not sufficient to cause the resin cement to achieve the highest polymerization not only in early stage, but also in late stage of polymerization. The sensitivity to the intensity of the light was different for each resin cement. Special clinical steps to compensate for the attenuated light intensity seem to be necessary for the resin cements which are susceptible to light intensity. (J Esthet Restor Dent 29:209–214, 2017).

AB - Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the polymerization mode of self-adhesive, dual-cured resin cements light-cured through overlying materials with different degree of translucency by measuring the degree of conversion (DC). Materials and Methods: Three kinds of self-adhesive, dual-cured resin cements (G-CEM LinkAceTM, Maxcem EliteTM, and BisCem®) were light-cured through three different restorative materials that included porcelain-fused metal (PFM), zirconia, and lithium disilicate. Polymerization kinetics were continuously evaluated using infrared spectroscopy after 0, 5, 10, and 30 min and 2 weeks of mixing. Data were statistically analyzed using two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), one-way ANOVA, and Tukey's multiple-comparison test (α = 0.05). Results: Regardless of the kind of resin cement, the light-cured groups showed higher DC than did the autopolymerization group under PFM at any point of time (p < 0.05). The time taken by the cements to achieve statistically similar DC between the zirconia and lithium disilicate groups increased in the following order: G-CEM LinkAceTM, BisCem®, and Maxcem EliteTM (p < 0.05). Conclusions: The degree of translucency of the restorative material can be a significant variable determining the polymerization aspects of self-adhesive, dual-cured resin cements. The resin cements light-cured through lithium disilicate and zirconia showed higher DC than that shown by cements cured under PFM at any measurement time. The lithium disilicate and zirconia groups showed differences in the early stage of polymerization for G-CEM LinkAceTM and BisCem®; however, the differences diminished at 2 weeks. CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE: Chemical polymerization is not sufficient to cause the resin cement to achieve the highest polymerization not only in early stage, but also in late stage of polymerization. The sensitivity to the intensity of the light was different for each resin cement. Special clinical steps to compensate for the attenuated light intensity seem to be necessary for the resin cements which are susceptible to light intensity. (J Esthet Restor Dent 29:209–214, 2017).

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