Potential toxicity of trace elements and nanomaterials to Chinese cabbage in arsenic- and lead-contaminated soil amended with biochars

Yasser Mahmoud Awad, Meththika Vithanage, Nabeel Khan Niazi, Muhammad Rizwan, Jörg Rinklebe, Jae E. Yang, Yong Sik Ok, Sang Soo Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To our knowledge, this is the first report on exploring the interactive effects of various biochars (BCs) and nanomaterials (NMs) on plant growth and bioavailability of trace elements in soil. This study evaluated the bioavailability and toxicity of arsenic (As), lead (Pb), and NMs to cabbage plants. The BCs were produced from rice husk (RB), sewage sludge, and bamboo wood (WB). The BCs at 2.5 and 5% (w w−1), NMs for removing As (NMs-As) and heavy metals (NMs-HM) at 3000 mg kg−1, and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNT) at 1000 mg kg−1 were applied in bioassay and incubation experiments (40 days), along with the unamended soil as the control. Results showed that the NMs-As and NMs-HM decreased seed germination at 3 days after sowing; however, their toxicity was eliminated by BCs. Growth parameters of cabbage revealed that the CNT was the most toxic NMs, as it was translocated in root and leaf cells, which was confirmed by transmission electron microscopic images. Bioavailable Pb was reduced by 1.2–3.8-folds in all amended rhizosphere and bulk soils. Amendments of 2.5% WB + NMs-As and 2.5% RB + NMs-As significantly decreased both bioavailable As and Pb.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-15
Number of pages15
JournalEnvironmental Geochemistry and Health
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2017 May 26
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Bioavailability
  • Carbon nanotubes
  • Carbonized biomass
  • Chars
  • Ecotoxicity
  • Nanoparticles

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Engineering
  • Environmental Chemistry
  • Water Science and Technology
  • Environmental Science(all)
  • Geochemistry and Petrology

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