Predictors of the severity and serious outcomes of anaphylaxis in korean adults: A multicenter retrospective case study

KAAACI Work Group on Urticaria/Angioedema/Anaphylaxis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

33 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: Differences in definitions of the condition, relevant triggers, and the geographical locations of study centers, cause estimates of the prevalence of anaphylaxis to vary. Recent epidemiological data indicate that the incidence of anaphylaxis is rising. Methods: To investigate the causes and clinical features of anaphylaxis in Korean adults, factors associated with the severity of the condition, and serious outcomes, a retrospective medical record review was performed on adult patients diagnosed with anaphylaxis between 2007 and 2011 in 15 University Hospitals of South Korea. Results: A total of 1,806 cases (52% male, age 16-86 years) were reported. Cutaneous symptoms (84.0%), combined with respiratory (53.9%) and/or cardiovascular (55.4%) symptoms, were the most frequent presentations. Using a recognized grading system, 1,776 cases could be classified as either mild, 340; moderate, 690; or severe, 746. Although eliciting factors varied significantly by age, gender, and regional and seasonal factors, drugs (46.5%; including nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, antibiotics, and radiocontrast media) were the most common cause of anaphylaxis, followed by foods (24.2%), insect stings (16.4%), exercise (5.9%), and unknown etiology (7.0%). All of age, multi-organ involvement, a history of allergic disease, and drug-induced anaphylaxis, were significant predictors of serious outcomes requiring hospital admission or prolongation of hospital stay. Epinephrine auto-injectors were prescribed for 7.4% of reported cases. Conclusions: The principal causes of anaphylaxis in Korean adults were drugs, food, and insect stings. Drug-associated anaphylaxis, a history of allergic disease, multi-organ involvement, and older age, were identified as predictors of serious outcomes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)22-29
Number of pages8
JournalAllergy, Asthma and Immunology Research
Volume7
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014 Jan 1

Fingerprint

Anaphylaxis
Retrospective Studies
Insect Bites and Stings
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Food
Republic of Korea
Contrast Media
Epinephrine
Medical Records
Length of Stay
Anti-Inflammatory Agents
Exercise
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Skin
Incidence

Keywords

  • Adult
  • Anaphylaxis
  • Epidemiology
  • Multicenter study
  • Serious outcomes
  • Severity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

Cite this

Predictors of the severity and serious outcomes of anaphylaxis in korean adults : A multicenter retrospective case study. / KAAACI Work Group on Urticaria/Angioedema/Anaphylaxis.

In: Allergy, Asthma and Immunology Research, Vol. 7, No. 1, 01.01.2014, p. 22-29.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{3258fe4b18b048109e645da57ce05ed5,
title = "Predictors of the severity and serious outcomes of anaphylaxis in korean adults: A multicenter retrospective case study",
abstract = "Purpose: Differences in definitions of the condition, relevant triggers, and the geographical locations of study centers, cause estimates of the prevalence of anaphylaxis to vary. Recent epidemiological data indicate that the incidence of anaphylaxis is rising. Methods: To investigate the causes and clinical features of anaphylaxis in Korean adults, factors associated with the severity of the condition, and serious outcomes, a retrospective medical record review was performed on adult patients diagnosed with anaphylaxis between 2007 and 2011 in 15 University Hospitals of South Korea. Results: A total of 1,806 cases (52{\%} male, age 16-86 years) were reported. Cutaneous symptoms (84.0{\%}), combined with respiratory (53.9{\%}) and/or cardiovascular (55.4{\%}) symptoms, were the most frequent presentations. Using a recognized grading system, 1,776 cases could be classified as either mild, 340; moderate, 690; or severe, 746. Although eliciting factors varied significantly by age, gender, and regional and seasonal factors, drugs (46.5{\%}; including nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, antibiotics, and radiocontrast media) were the most common cause of anaphylaxis, followed by foods (24.2{\%}), insect stings (16.4{\%}), exercise (5.9{\%}), and unknown etiology (7.0{\%}). All of age, multi-organ involvement, a history of allergic disease, and drug-induced anaphylaxis, were significant predictors of serious outcomes requiring hospital admission or prolongation of hospital stay. Epinephrine auto-injectors were prescribed for 7.4{\%} of reported cases. Conclusions: The principal causes of anaphylaxis in Korean adults were drugs, food, and insect stings. Drug-associated anaphylaxis, a history of allergic disease, multi-organ involvement, and older age, were identified as predictors of serious outcomes.",
keywords = "Adult, Anaphylaxis, Epidemiology, Multicenter study, Serious outcomes, Severity",
author = "{KAAACI Work Group on Urticaria/Angioedema/Anaphylaxis} and Ye, {Young Min} and Kim, {Mi Kyeong} and Kang, {Hye Ryun} and Kim, {Tae Bum} and Sohn, {Seong Wook} and Koh, {Young Il} and Park, {Hye Kyung} and Jang, {Gwang Cheon} and Kim, {Cheol Woo} and Jee, {Young Koo} and Hur, {Gyu Young} and Kim, {Joo Hee} and Kim, {Sang Heon} and Choi, {Gil Soon} and Lee, {Soo Keol} and Park, {Hae Sim}",
year = "2014",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.4168/aair.2015.7.1.22",
language = "English",
volume = "7",
pages = "22--29",
journal = "Allergy, Asthma and Immunology Research",
issn = "2092-7355",
publisher = "Korean Academy of Asthma, Allergy and Clinical Immunology",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Predictors of the severity and serious outcomes of anaphylaxis in korean adults

T2 - A multicenter retrospective case study

AU - KAAACI Work Group on Urticaria/Angioedema/Anaphylaxis

AU - Ye, Young Min

AU - Kim, Mi Kyeong

AU - Kang, Hye Ryun

AU - Kim, Tae Bum

AU - Sohn, Seong Wook

AU - Koh, Young Il

AU - Park, Hye Kyung

AU - Jang, Gwang Cheon

AU - Kim, Cheol Woo

AU - Jee, Young Koo

AU - Hur, Gyu Young

AU - Kim, Joo Hee

AU - Kim, Sang Heon

AU - Choi, Gil Soon

AU - Lee, Soo Keol

AU - Park, Hae Sim

PY - 2014/1/1

Y1 - 2014/1/1

N2 - Purpose: Differences in definitions of the condition, relevant triggers, and the geographical locations of study centers, cause estimates of the prevalence of anaphylaxis to vary. Recent epidemiological data indicate that the incidence of anaphylaxis is rising. Methods: To investigate the causes and clinical features of anaphylaxis in Korean adults, factors associated with the severity of the condition, and serious outcomes, a retrospective medical record review was performed on adult patients diagnosed with anaphylaxis between 2007 and 2011 in 15 University Hospitals of South Korea. Results: A total of 1,806 cases (52% male, age 16-86 years) were reported. Cutaneous symptoms (84.0%), combined with respiratory (53.9%) and/or cardiovascular (55.4%) symptoms, were the most frequent presentations. Using a recognized grading system, 1,776 cases could be classified as either mild, 340; moderate, 690; or severe, 746. Although eliciting factors varied significantly by age, gender, and regional and seasonal factors, drugs (46.5%; including nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, antibiotics, and radiocontrast media) were the most common cause of anaphylaxis, followed by foods (24.2%), insect stings (16.4%), exercise (5.9%), and unknown etiology (7.0%). All of age, multi-organ involvement, a history of allergic disease, and drug-induced anaphylaxis, were significant predictors of serious outcomes requiring hospital admission or prolongation of hospital stay. Epinephrine auto-injectors were prescribed for 7.4% of reported cases. Conclusions: The principal causes of anaphylaxis in Korean adults were drugs, food, and insect stings. Drug-associated anaphylaxis, a history of allergic disease, multi-organ involvement, and older age, were identified as predictors of serious outcomes.

AB - Purpose: Differences in definitions of the condition, relevant triggers, and the geographical locations of study centers, cause estimates of the prevalence of anaphylaxis to vary. Recent epidemiological data indicate that the incidence of anaphylaxis is rising. Methods: To investigate the causes and clinical features of anaphylaxis in Korean adults, factors associated with the severity of the condition, and serious outcomes, a retrospective medical record review was performed on adult patients diagnosed with anaphylaxis between 2007 and 2011 in 15 University Hospitals of South Korea. Results: A total of 1,806 cases (52% male, age 16-86 years) were reported. Cutaneous symptoms (84.0%), combined with respiratory (53.9%) and/or cardiovascular (55.4%) symptoms, were the most frequent presentations. Using a recognized grading system, 1,776 cases could be classified as either mild, 340; moderate, 690; or severe, 746. Although eliciting factors varied significantly by age, gender, and regional and seasonal factors, drugs (46.5%; including nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, antibiotics, and radiocontrast media) were the most common cause of anaphylaxis, followed by foods (24.2%), insect stings (16.4%), exercise (5.9%), and unknown etiology (7.0%). All of age, multi-organ involvement, a history of allergic disease, and drug-induced anaphylaxis, were significant predictors of serious outcomes requiring hospital admission or prolongation of hospital stay. Epinephrine auto-injectors were prescribed for 7.4% of reported cases. Conclusions: The principal causes of anaphylaxis in Korean adults were drugs, food, and insect stings. Drug-associated anaphylaxis, a history of allergic disease, multi-organ involvement, and older age, were identified as predictors of serious outcomes.

KW - Adult

KW - Anaphylaxis

KW - Epidemiology

KW - Multicenter study

KW - Serious outcomes

KW - Severity

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84919345908&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84919345908&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.4168/aair.2015.7.1.22

DO - 10.4168/aair.2015.7.1.22

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:84919345908

VL - 7

SP - 22

EP - 29

JO - Allergy, Asthma and Immunology Research

JF - Allergy, Asthma and Immunology Research

SN - 2092-7355

IS - 1

ER -