Preparation of a stable phospholipid monolayer grafted onto a methacryloyl-terminated substrate as a blood compatible materials

Kwang Meyung Kim, Chulhee Kim, Youngro Byun

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We have prepared a surface-grafted phospholipid monolayer by in situ polymerization carried out at the interface between a pre-assembled phospholipid monolayer and a methacryloyl-terminated substrate. The phospholipid containing an acryloyl moiety, 1-stearoyl-2-[12-(acryloyloxy)-dodecanoyl]-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (acryloyl-PC), was pre-assembled by vesicle fusion onto methacryloyl-terminated substrates which were silanized with 3-(trimethoxysilyl)propyl methacrylate (TSM). The acryloyl-PC monolayer and methacryloyl-terminated substrates were then polymerized in situ by adding a water-soluble initiator, 2,2-azobis(2-methylpropionamidine) dihydrochloride (AAPD), at 60°C for 15 min. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements indicated that the polymerized phospholipid surface on the TSM-silanized substrates formed a lipid monolayer structure with some defects. The polymerized phospholipid surfaces also showed good stability in methanol due to chemical bonding to solid surfaces. The grafting efficiency of acryloyl-PC monolayer on the TSM substrate, which was calculated by the relative carbon ratio of the polymerized acryloyl-PC monolayer on TSM substrate before and after methanol washing, was 94.5%. For comparative analysis, the acryloyl-PC monolayer was also polymerized onto dimethyl-terminated substrates silanized with dichlorodimethylsilane (DCM). In the absence of surface grafting moieties on solid substrates, the laterally polymerized acryloyl-PC monolayer physically adsorbed on substrates was easily removed in an organic solvent. The surface-grafted phospholipid monolayer was also greatly effective in the prevention of platelet adhesion.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)887-902
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Biomaterials Science, Polymer Edition
Volume14
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2003 Nov 14
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Phosphorylcholine
Phospholipids
Monolayers
Blood
Methacrylates
Substrates
Methanol
Photoelectron Spectroscopy
Atomic Force Microscopy
Polymerization
Blood Platelets
Carbon
Platelets
Lipids
Washing
Organic solvents
Water
Atomic force microscopy
Fusion reactions
Adhesion

Keywords

  • Blood compatibility
  • In situ polymerization
  • Phospholipid monolayer
  • Surface grafting

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biophysics
  • Bioengineering
  • Biomaterials
  • Biomedical Engineering

Cite this

Preparation of a stable phospholipid monolayer grafted onto a methacryloyl-terminated substrate as a blood compatible materials. / Kim, Kwang Meyung; Kim, Chulhee; Byun, Youngro.

In: Journal of Biomaterials Science, Polymer Edition, Vol. 14, No. 9, 14.11.2003, p. 887-902.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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N2 - We have prepared a surface-grafted phospholipid monolayer by in situ polymerization carried out at the interface between a pre-assembled phospholipid monolayer and a methacryloyl-terminated substrate. The phospholipid containing an acryloyl moiety, 1-stearoyl-2-[12-(acryloyloxy)-dodecanoyl]-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (acryloyl-PC), was pre-assembled by vesicle fusion onto methacryloyl-terminated substrates which were silanized with 3-(trimethoxysilyl)propyl methacrylate (TSM). The acryloyl-PC monolayer and methacryloyl-terminated substrates were then polymerized in situ by adding a water-soluble initiator, 2,2-azobis(2-methylpropionamidine) dihydrochloride (AAPD), at 60°C for 15 min. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements indicated that the polymerized phospholipid surface on the TSM-silanized substrates formed a lipid monolayer structure with some defects. The polymerized phospholipid surfaces also showed good stability in methanol due to chemical bonding to solid surfaces. The grafting efficiency of acryloyl-PC monolayer on the TSM substrate, which was calculated by the relative carbon ratio of the polymerized acryloyl-PC monolayer on TSM substrate before and after methanol washing, was 94.5%. For comparative analysis, the acryloyl-PC monolayer was also polymerized onto dimethyl-terminated substrates silanized with dichlorodimethylsilane (DCM). In the absence of surface grafting moieties on solid substrates, the laterally polymerized acryloyl-PC monolayer physically adsorbed on substrates was easily removed in an organic solvent. The surface-grafted phospholipid monolayer was also greatly effective in the prevention of platelet adhesion.

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