Prevalence and association of snoring, anthropometry and hypertension in Korea

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives. There is little data on the relationships between hypertension and snoring in Asians, whose anthropometrics and prevalence of diseases are different from Western populations. This study evaluated the prevalence and the factors associated with snoring in an adult Korean population (≥ 18 years). Methods. The questions on snoring were divided into five Likert scales ["never" to "severe"(everyday)]. Subjects were divided into two mutually exclusive groups: moderate and severe groups of snorers considered habitual snorers, and never, sometimes and mild snorers considered the non-snoring group. We classified the severity of hypertension according to JNC 6. Independent variables included demographic and baseline characteristics, hypertension, anthropometrics, current medical history, medications and substance use. Results. Overall prevalence of habitual snoring is 15.58% in males and 8.40% in females. The mean age, body mass index (BMI), both systolic and diastolic blood pressure, and anthropometric data, including neck, chest and abdominal girth, were significantly associated with the snoring group in both men and women. Neck length was only significantly shorter in females, not in males. Alcohol consumption rate was significantly higher in the snoring group of the men, but was lower in the snoring group in women. Smoking did not show any significant relationship with snoring and non-snoring groups in both genders. Snoring was significantly higher in the menopause group (odds ratio 2.8) than the premenopausal group. Fifty per cent in the snoring group and 33.08% in the non-snoring group were diagnosed as having hypertension. The prevalence of hypertension was significantly higher in the snoring group aged < 40 years and was weakly significant in those subjects aged between 40 and 60 years in males. The prevalence of hypertension was significantly higher in the snoring group in those both aged < 40 years and those aged between 40 and 60 years in females. Those aged > 60 years old in both genders showed no significant differences in the prevalence of hypertension between snorers and non-snorers. The relationship between hypertension and snoring after adjustments for age, BMI, age, smoke and alcohol usage showed a dose-response relationship in both genders. Conclusions. This study showed the dose-response relationship between hypertension and snoring, even after adjustments for age, BMI, age, smoke and alcohol usage. Snoring significantly increased after menopause in women. Snoring had a significant relationship with neck length in females but not in males. There is a dose-response relationship between snoring and hypertension in both genders in those subjects aged < 60 years old.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)210-216
Number of pages7
JournalBlood Pressure
Volume14
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2005 Oct 10

Fingerprint

Snoring
Anthropometry
Korea
Hypertension
Body Mass Index
Neck
Menopause
Smoke
Alcohols
Blood Pressure

Keywords

  • Anthropometry
  • Hypertension
  • Prevalence
  • Sleep
  • Snoring

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Internal Medicine

Cite this

Prevalence and association of snoring, anthropometry and hypertension in Korea. / Park, Chang Gyu; Shin, Chol.

In: Blood Pressure, Vol. 14, No. 4, 10.10.2005, p. 210-216.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{810b5d4aa9ac477f88c899e13fe3cfb3,
title = "Prevalence and association of snoring, anthropometry and hypertension in Korea",
abstract = "Objectives. There is little data on the relationships between hypertension and snoring in Asians, whose anthropometrics and prevalence of diseases are different from Western populations. This study evaluated the prevalence and the factors associated with snoring in an adult Korean population (≥ 18 years). Methods. The questions on snoring were divided into five Likert scales [{"}never{"} to {"}severe{"}(everyday)]. Subjects were divided into two mutually exclusive groups: moderate and severe groups of snorers considered habitual snorers, and never, sometimes and mild snorers considered the non-snoring group. We classified the severity of hypertension according to JNC 6. Independent variables included demographic and baseline characteristics, hypertension, anthropometrics, current medical history, medications and substance use. Results. Overall prevalence of habitual snoring is 15.58{\%} in males and 8.40{\%} in females. The mean age, body mass index (BMI), both systolic and diastolic blood pressure, and anthropometric data, including neck, chest and abdominal girth, were significantly associated with the snoring group in both men and women. Neck length was only significantly shorter in females, not in males. Alcohol consumption rate was significantly higher in the snoring group of the men, but was lower in the snoring group in women. Smoking did not show any significant relationship with snoring and non-snoring groups in both genders. Snoring was significantly higher in the menopause group (odds ratio 2.8) than the premenopausal group. Fifty per cent in the snoring group and 33.08{\%} in the non-snoring group were diagnosed as having hypertension. The prevalence of hypertension was significantly higher in the snoring group aged < 40 years and was weakly significant in those subjects aged between 40 and 60 years in males. The prevalence of hypertension was significantly higher in the snoring group in those both aged < 40 years and those aged between 40 and 60 years in females. Those aged > 60 years old in both genders showed no significant differences in the prevalence of hypertension between snorers and non-snorers. The relationship between hypertension and snoring after adjustments for age, BMI, age, smoke and alcohol usage showed a dose-response relationship in both genders. Conclusions. This study showed the dose-response relationship between hypertension and snoring, even after adjustments for age, BMI, age, smoke and alcohol usage. Snoring significantly increased after menopause in women. Snoring had a significant relationship with neck length in females but not in males. There is a dose-response relationship between snoring and hypertension in both genders in those subjects aged < 60 years old.",
keywords = "Anthropometry, Hypertension, Prevalence, Sleep, Snoring",
author = "Park, {Chang Gyu} and Chol Shin",
year = "2005",
month = "10",
day = "10",
doi = "10.1080/08037050510034248",
language = "English",
volume = "14",
pages = "210--216",
journal = "Blood Pressure",
issn = "0803-7051",
publisher = "Informa Healthcare",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Prevalence and association of snoring, anthropometry and hypertension in Korea

AU - Park, Chang Gyu

AU - Shin, Chol

PY - 2005/10/10

Y1 - 2005/10/10

N2 - Objectives. There is little data on the relationships between hypertension and snoring in Asians, whose anthropometrics and prevalence of diseases are different from Western populations. This study evaluated the prevalence and the factors associated with snoring in an adult Korean population (≥ 18 years). Methods. The questions on snoring were divided into five Likert scales ["never" to "severe"(everyday)]. Subjects were divided into two mutually exclusive groups: moderate and severe groups of snorers considered habitual snorers, and never, sometimes and mild snorers considered the non-snoring group. We classified the severity of hypertension according to JNC 6. Independent variables included demographic and baseline characteristics, hypertension, anthropometrics, current medical history, medications and substance use. Results. Overall prevalence of habitual snoring is 15.58% in males and 8.40% in females. The mean age, body mass index (BMI), both systolic and diastolic blood pressure, and anthropometric data, including neck, chest and abdominal girth, were significantly associated with the snoring group in both men and women. Neck length was only significantly shorter in females, not in males. Alcohol consumption rate was significantly higher in the snoring group of the men, but was lower in the snoring group in women. Smoking did not show any significant relationship with snoring and non-snoring groups in both genders. Snoring was significantly higher in the menopause group (odds ratio 2.8) than the premenopausal group. Fifty per cent in the snoring group and 33.08% in the non-snoring group were diagnosed as having hypertension. The prevalence of hypertension was significantly higher in the snoring group aged < 40 years and was weakly significant in those subjects aged between 40 and 60 years in males. The prevalence of hypertension was significantly higher in the snoring group in those both aged < 40 years and those aged between 40 and 60 years in females. Those aged > 60 years old in both genders showed no significant differences in the prevalence of hypertension between snorers and non-snorers. The relationship between hypertension and snoring after adjustments for age, BMI, age, smoke and alcohol usage showed a dose-response relationship in both genders. Conclusions. This study showed the dose-response relationship between hypertension and snoring, even after adjustments for age, BMI, age, smoke and alcohol usage. Snoring significantly increased after menopause in women. Snoring had a significant relationship with neck length in females but not in males. There is a dose-response relationship between snoring and hypertension in both genders in those subjects aged < 60 years old.

AB - Objectives. There is little data on the relationships between hypertension and snoring in Asians, whose anthropometrics and prevalence of diseases are different from Western populations. This study evaluated the prevalence and the factors associated with snoring in an adult Korean population (≥ 18 years). Methods. The questions on snoring were divided into five Likert scales ["never" to "severe"(everyday)]. Subjects were divided into two mutually exclusive groups: moderate and severe groups of snorers considered habitual snorers, and never, sometimes and mild snorers considered the non-snoring group. We classified the severity of hypertension according to JNC 6. Independent variables included demographic and baseline characteristics, hypertension, anthropometrics, current medical history, medications and substance use. Results. Overall prevalence of habitual snoring is 15.58% in males and 8.40% in females. The mean age, body mass index (BMI), both systolic and diastolic blood pressure, and anthropometric data, including neck, chest and abdominal girth, were significantly associated with the snoring group in both men and women. Neck length was only significantly shorter in females, not in males. Alcohol consumption rate was significantly higher in the snoring group of the men, but was lower in the snoring group in women. Smoking did not show any significant relationship with snoring and non-snoring groups in both genders. Snoring was significantly higher in the menopause group (odds ratio 2.8) than the premenopausal group. Fifty per cent in the snoring group and 33.08% in the non-snoring group were diagnosed as having hypertension. The prevalence of hypertension was significantly higher in the snoring group aged < 40 years and was weakly significant in those subjects aged between 40 and 60 years in males. The prevalence of hypertension was significantly higher in the snoring group in those both aged < 40 years and those aged between 40 and 60 years in females. Those aged > 60 years old in both genders showed no significant differences in the prevalence of hypertension between snorers and non-snorers. The relationship between hypertension and snoring after adjustments for age, BMI, age, smoke and alcohol usage showed a dose-response relationship in both genders. Conclusions. This study showed the dose-response relationship between hypertension and snoring, even after adjustments for age, BMI, age, smoke and alcohol usage. Snoring significantly increased after menopause in women. Snoring had a significant relationship with neck length in females but not in males. There is a dose-response relationship between snoring and hypertension in both genders in those subjects aged < 60 years old.

KW - Anthropometry

KW - Hypertension

KW - Prevalence

KW - Sleep

KW - Snoring

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=25844517142&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=25844517142&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1080/08037050510034248

DO - 10.1080/08037050510034248

M3 - Article

C2 - 16126554

AN - SCOPUS:25844517142

VL - 14

SP - 210

EP - 216

JO - Blood Pressure

JF - Blood Pressure

SN - 0803-7051

IS - 4

ER -