Progress in Materials, Solution Processes, and Long-Term Stability for Large-Area Organic Photovoltaics

Sungmin Park, Taehee Kim, Seongwon Yoon, Chang Woo Koh, Han Young Woo, Hae Jung Son

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Organic solar cells based on bulk heterojunctions (BHJs) are attractive energy-conversion devices that can generate electricity from absorbed sunlight by dissociating excitons and collecting charge carriers. Recent breakthroughs attained by development of nonfullerene acceptors result in significant enhancement in power conversion efficiency (PCEs) exceeding 17%. However, most of researches have focused on pursuing high efficiency of small-area (<1 cm2) unit cells fabricated usually with spin coating. For practical application of organic photovoltaics (OPVs) from lab-scale unit cells to industrial products, it is essential to develop efficient technologies that can extend active area of devices with minimized loss of performance and ensured operational stability. In this progress report, an overview of recent advancements in materials and processing technologies is provided for transitioning from small-area laboratory-scale devices to large-area industrial scale modules. First, development of materials that satisfy requirements of high tolerability in active layer thickness and large-area adaptability is introduced. Second, morphology control using various coating techniques in a large active area is discussed. Third, the recent research progress is also underlined for understanding mechanisms of OPV degradation and studies for improving device long-term stability along with reliable evaluation procedures.

Original languageEnglish
Article number2002217
JournalAdvanced Materials
Volume32
Issue number51
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2020 Dec 22

Keywords

  • large-area modules
  • morphology
  • nonfullerene acceptors
  • organic solar cells
  • stability

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Materials Science(all)
  • Mechanics of Materials
  • Mechanical Engineering

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