Proportionate mortality of crop and livestock farmers in the United States, 1984-1993

Eun Il Lee, Carol A. Burnett, Nina Lalich, Lorraine L. Cameron, John P. Sestito

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

75 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Livestock farmers are more likely to be exposed to a variety of different farming hazards than crop farmers. An analysis of occupation and industry-coded U.S. death certificate data from 26 states for the years 1984-1993 was conducted to evaluate mortality patterns among crop and livestock farmers. Methods: Cause-specific proportionate mortality ratios (PMRs) were calculated using a National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) computer program designed to calculate sex and race specific PMRs for occupations and industries in population-based data. Results: Among white male (WM) livestock farmers, there was a significantly higher mortality from cancer of the pancreas, prostate and brain, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL), multiple myeloma, acute and chronic lymphoid leukemia, and Parkinson's disease. WM crop farmers showed significantly higher mortality risk for cancer of the lip, skin, multiple myeloma, and chronic lymphoid leukemia. Conclusions: These disease trends suggested that livestock farmers might be exposed to more carcinogens or agricultural chemicals than crop farmers.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)410-420
Number of pages11
JournalAmerican Journal of Industrial Medicine
Volume42
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2002 Nov 1

Fingerprint

Livestock
Mortality
Multiple Myeloma
Occupations
Industry
Lip Neoplasms
Agricultural Crops
National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (U.S.)
Agrochemicals
Lymphoid Leukemia
Death Certificates
Skin Neoplasms
Farmers
Agriculture
Pancreatic Neoplasms
Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma
Brain Neoplasms
Carcinogens
Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma
Parkinson Disease

Keywords

  • Agriculture
  • Cancer
  • Mortality

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Proportionate mortality of crop and livestock farmers in the United States, 1984-1993. / Lee, Eun Il; Burnett, Carol A.; Lalich, Nina; Cameron, Lorraine L.; Sestito, John P.

In: American Journal of Industrial Medicine, Vol. 42, No. 5, 01.11.2002, p. 410-420.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lee, Eun Il ; Burnett, Carol A. ; Lalich, Nina ; Cameron, Lorraine L. ; Sestito, John P. / Proportionate mortality of crop and livestock farmers in the United States, 1984-1993. In: American Journal of Industrial Medicine. 2002 ; Vol. 42, No. 5. pp. 410-420.
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