Pulmonary tuberculosis confirmed by percutaneous transthoracic needle biopsy: Analysis of CT findings and review of correlations with underlying lung disease

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Abstract

Background: Pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) can produce unusual radiographic findings. Further, negative sputum and bronchoscopic results are common. Early diagnosis is equally as significant as treatment in the reduction of morbidity and mortality associated with pulmonary TB.

Aims: The aim of this study was to assess computed tomography (CT) findings of pulmonary TB, confirmed via percutaneous transthoracic needle biopsy (PTNB), and to correlate these findings with coexisting, underlying, lung diseases if present.

Study Design: Cross sectional study.

Methods: We selected eighty-four patients who were diagnosed with pulmonary TB by way of PTNB. Initially, acid-fast bacilli smear test results from these patients were negative. CT findings were reviewed to detect the presence of parenchymal abnormalities as follows: nodule(s) (<3 cm in diameter), mass (any masses ≥3 cm), daughter nodules, air-space consolidation, cavitation, calcification, lymphadenopathy, mediastinal lymphadenopathy, and associated lung parenchymal disease.

Results: The CT findings of pulmonary TB confirmed by PTNB included nodules in 44 of 84 (52.4%) cases; 15 of these 44 cases (34.1%) had daughter nodules. The second most common finding was masses in 24 cases (28.6%), nine of which also had daughter nodules. 16 cases (19.0%) displayed nonsegmental consolidation. Of these 16 cases, four had coexisting usual interstitial pneumonia; four others had emphysema. Two patients with a mass had underlying pneumoconiosis.

Conclusion: Nodules or a mass mimicking lung cancer were the most common findings on CT scans in patients with pulmonary TB, confirmed via PTNB. The second most common finding was airspace consolidation. Therefore, PNTB is useful for the accurate diagnosis of pulmonary TB in the following cases: airspace consolidation or mass associated with underlying usual interstitial pneumonia, emphysema mimicking lung malignancy or cases of bacterial pneumonia. (Balkan Med J 2014;31:208-13).

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)208-213
Number of pages6
JournalBalkan Medical Journal
Volume31
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014 Jan 1

Fingerprint

Needle Biopsy
Pulmonary Tuberculosis
Lung Diseases
Tomography
Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis
Emphysema
Balkan Peninsula
Bacterial Pneumonia
Pneumoconiosis
Sputum
Bacillus
Early Diagnosis
Lung Neoplasms
Cross-Sectional Studies
Air
Morbidity
Lung
Acids
Mortality
Neoplasms

Keywords

  • Percutaneous transthoracic needle biopsy
  • Pulmonary
  • Tuberculosis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

@article{1821a0cb80c74f4bb7264dd20801f86d,
title = "Pulmonary tuberculosis confirmed by percutaneous transthoracic needle biopsy: Analysis of CT findings and review of correlations with underlying lung disease",
abstract = "Background: Pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) can produce unusual radiographic findings. Further, negative sputum and bronchoscopic results are common. Early diagnosis is equally as significant as treatment in the reduction of morbidity and mortality associated with pulmonary TB.Aims: The aim of this study was to assess computed tomography (CT) findings of pulmonary TB, confirmed via percutaneous transthoracic needle biopsy (PTNB), and to correlate these findings with coexisting, underlying, lung diseases if present.Study Design: Cross sectional study.Methods: We selected eighty-four patients who were diagnosed with pulmonary TB by way of PTNB. Initially, acid-fast bacilli smear test results from these patients were negative. CT findings were reviewed to detect the presence of parenchymal abnormalities as follows: nodule(s) (<3 cm in diameter), mass (any masses ≥3 cm), daughter nodules, air-space consolidation, cavitation, calcification, lymphadenopathy, mediastinal lymphadenopathy, and associated lung parenchymal disease.Results: The CT findings of pulmonary TB confirmed by PTNB included nodules in 44 of 84 (52.4{\%}) cases; 15 of these 44 cases (34.1{\%}) had daughter nodules. The second most common finding was masses in 24 cases (28.6{\%}), nine of which also had daughter nodules. 16 cases (19.0{\%}) displayed nonsegmental consolidation. Of these 16 cases, four had coexisting usual interstitial pneumonia; four others had emphysema. Two patients with a mass had underlying pneumoconiosis.Conclusion: Nodules or a mass mimicking lung cancer were the most common findings on CT scans in patients with pulmonary TB, confirmed via PTNB. The second most common finding was airspace consolidation. Therefore, PNTB is useful for the accurate diagnosis of pulmonary TB in the following cases: airspace consolidation or mass associated with underlying usual interstitial pneumonia, emphysema mimicking lung malignancy or cases of bacterial pneumonia. (Balkan Med J 2014;31:208-13).",
keywords = "Percutaneous transthoracic needle biopsy, Pulmonary, Tuberculosis",
author = "Choo, {Ji Young} and Lee, {Ki Yeol} and Kim, {Mi Young} and Eun-Young Kang and Oh, {Yu Whan} and Lee, {Seung Hwa} and Seo, {Bo Kyoung} and Bo-Kyung Je",
year = "2014",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.5152/balkanmedj.2014.13187",
language = "English",
volume = "31",
pages = "208--213",
journal = "Balkan Medical Journal",
issn = "2146-3123",
publisher = "Trakya Universitesi",
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TY - JOUR

T1 - Pulmonary tuberculosis confirmed by percutaneous transthoracic needle biopsy

T2 - Analysis of CT findings and review of correlations with underlying lung disease

AU - Choo, Ji Young

AU - Lee, Ki Yeol

AU - Kim, Mi Young

AU - Kang, Eun-Young

AU - Oh, Yu Whan

AU - Lee, Seung Hwa

AU - Seo, Bo Kyoung

AU - Je, Bo-Kyung

PY - 2014/1/1

Y1 - 2014/1/1

N2 - Background: Pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) can produce unusual radiographic findings. Further, negative sputum and bronchoscopic results are common. Early diagnosis is equally as significant as treatment in the reduction of morbidity and mortality associated with pulmonary TB.Aims: The aim of this study was to assess computed tomography (CT) findings of pulmonary TB, confirmed via percutaneous transthoracic needle biopsy (PTNB), and to correlate these findings with coexisting, underlying, lung diseases if present.Study Design: Cross sectional study.Methods: We selected eighty-four patients who were diagnosed with pulmonary TB by way of PTNB. Initially, acid-fast bacilli smear test results from these patients were negative. CT findings were reviewed to detect the presence of parenchymal abnormalities as follows: nodule(s) (<3 cm in diameter), mass (any masses ≥3 cm), daughter nodules, air-space consolidation, cavitation, calcification, lymphadenopathy, mediastinal lymphadenopathy, and associated lung parenchymal disease.Results: The CT findings of pulmonary TB confirmed by PTNB included nodules in 44 of 84 (52.4%) cases; 15 of these 44 cases (34.1%) had daughter nodules. The second most common finding was masses in 24 cases (28.6%), nine of which also had daughter nodules. 16 cases (19.0%) displayed nonsegmental consolidation. Of these 16 cases, four had coexisting usual interstitial pneumonia; four others had emphysema. Two patients with a mass had underlying pneumoconiosis.Conclusion: Nodules or a mass mimicking lung cancer were the most common findings on CT scans in patients with pulmonary TB, confirmed via PTNB. The second most common finding was airspace consolidation. Therefore, PNTB is useful for the accurate diagnosis of pulmonary TB in the following cases: airspace consolidation or mass associated with underlying usual interstitial pneumonia, emphysema mimicking lung malignancy or cases of bacterial pneumonia. (Balkan Med J 2014;31:208-13).

AB - Background: Pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) can produce unusual radiographic findings. Further, negative sputum and bronchoscopic results are common. Early diagnosis is equally as significant as treatment in the reduction of morbidity and mortality associated with pulmonary TB.Aims: The aim of this study was to assess computed tomography (CT) findings of pulmonary TB, confirmed via percutaneous transthoracic needle biopsy (PTNB), and to correlate these findings with coexisting, underlying, lung diseases if present.Study Design: Cross sectional study.Methods: We selected eighty-four patients who were diagnosed with pulmonary TB by way of PTNB. Initially, acid-fast bacilli smear test results from these patients were negative. CT findings were reviewed to detect the presence of parenchymal abnormalities as follows: nodule(s) (<3 cm in diameter), mass (any masses ≥3 cm), daughter nodules, air-space consolidation, cavitation, calcification, lymphadenopathy, mediastinal lymphadenopathy, and associated lung parenchymal disease.Results: The CT findings of pulmonary TB confirmed by PTNB included nodules in 44 of 84 (52.4%) cases; 15 of these 44 cases (34.1%) had daughter nodules. The second most common finding was masses in 24 cases (28.6%), nine of which also had daughter nodules. 16 cases (19.0%) displayed nonsegmental consolidation. Of these 16 cases, four had coexisting usual interstitial pneumonia; four others had emphysema. Two patients with a mass had underlying pneumoconiosis.Conclusion: Nodules or a mass mimicking lung cancer were the most common findings on CT scans in patients with pulmonary TB, confirmed via PTNB. The second most common finding was airspace consolidation. Therefore, PNTB is useful for the accurate diagnosis of pulmonary TB in the following cases: airspace consolidation or mass associated with underlying usual interstitial pneumonia, emphysema mimicking lung malignancy or cases of bacterial pneumonia. (Balkan Med J 2014;31:208-13).

KW - Percutaneous transthoracic needle biopsy

KW - Pulmonary

KW - Tuberculosis

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