Reconstruction of integrin activation

Feng Ye, Chungho Kim, Mark H. Ginsberg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

56 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Integrins are integral membrane proteins that mediate cell-matrix and cell-cell adhesion. They are important for vascular development and hematopoiesis, immune and inflammatory responses, and hemostasis. Integrins are also signaling receptors that can transmit information bidirectionally across plasma membranes. Research in the past 2 decades has made progress in unraveling the mechanisms of integrin signaling and brings the field to the moment of attempting synthetic reconstruction of the signaling pathways in vitro. Reconstruction of biologic processes provides stringent tests of our understanding of the process, as evidenced by studies of other biologic machines, such as ATP synthase, lactose permease, and G-protein-coupled receptors. Here, we review recent progress in reconstructing integrin signaling and the insights that we have gained through these experiments.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)26-33
Number of pages8
JournalBlood
Volume119
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012 Jan 5
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Integrins
Chemical activation
Cell adhesion
Hematopoiesis
Cell membranes
G-Protein-Coupled Receptors
Hemostasis
Cell Adhesion
Blood Vessels
Membrane Proteins
Adenosine Triphosphate
Cell Membrane
Research
Experiments

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology
  • Biochemistry
  • Cell Biology
  • Immunology

Cite this

Reconstruction of integrin activation. / Ye, Feng; Kim, Chungho; Ginsberg, Mark H.

In: Blood, Vol. 119, No. 1, 05.01.2012, p. 26-33.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ye, Feng ; Kim, Chungho ; Ginsberg, Mark H. / Reconstruction of integrin activation. In: Blood. 2012 ; Vol. 119, No. 1. pp. 26-33.
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