Rediscovery of nanoparticle-based therapeutics: boosting immunogenic cell death for potential application in cancer immunotherapy

Suah Yang, In Cheol Sun, Hee Sook Hwang, Man Kyu Shim, Hong Yeol Yoon, Kwangmeyung Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Abstract

Immunogenic cell death (ICD) occurring by chemical and physical stimuli has shown the potential to activate an adaptive immune response in the immune-competent living body through the release of danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) into the tumor microenvironment (TME). However, limitations to the long-term immune responses and systemic toxicity of conventional ICD inducers have led to unsatisfactory therapeutic efficacy in ICD-based cancer immunotherapy. Until now, various nanoparticle-based ICD-inducers have been developed to induce an antitumor immune response without severe toxicity, and to efficiently elicit an anticancer immune response against target cancer cells. In this review, we introduce a recent advance in the designs and applications of nanoparticle-based therapeutics to elicit ICD for effective cancer immunotherapy. In particular, combination strategies of nanoparticle-based ICD inducers with typical theranostic modalities are introduced intensively. Subsequently, we discuss the expected challenges and future direction of nanoparticle-based ICD inducers to provide strategies for boosting ICD in cancer immunotherapy. These versatile designs and applications of nanoparticle-based therapeutics for ICD can provide advantages to improve the therapeutic efficacy of cancer immunotherapy.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3983-4001
Number of pages19
JournalJournal of Materials Chemistry B
Volume9
Issue number19
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2021 May 21

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Chemistry(all)
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Materials Science(all)

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Rediscovery of nanoparticle-based therapeutics: boosting immunogenic cell death for potential application in cancer immunotherapy'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this