Reflection phase microscopy using spatio-temporal coherence of light

Youngwoon Choi, Poorya Hosseini, Jeon Woong Kang, Sungsam Kang, Taeseok Daniel Yang, Min Gyu Hyeon, Beop-Min Kim, Peter T.C. So, Zahid Yaqoob

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Many disease states are associated with cellular biomechanical changes as markers. Label-free phase microscopes are used to quantify thermally driven interface fluctuations, which allow the deduction of important cellular rheological properties. Here, the spatio-temporal coherence of light was used to implement a high-speed reflection phase microscope with superior depth selectivity and higher phase sensitivity. Nanometric scale motion of cytoplasmic structures can be visualized with fine details and three-dimensional resolution. Specifically, the spontaneous fluctuation occurring on the nuclear membrane of a living cell was observed at video rate. By converting the reflection phase into displacement, the sensitivity in quantifying nuclear membrane fluctuation was found to be about one nanometer. A reflection phase microscope can potentially elucidate biomechanical mechanisms of pathological and physiological processes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1468-1473
Number of pages6
JournalOptica
Volume5
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018 Nov 20

Fingerprint

Microscopic examination
Microscopes
microscopes
microscopy
membranes
Membranes
deduction
markers
Labels
selectivity
Cells
high speed
sensitivity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Atomic and Molecular Physics, and Optics

Cite this

Choi, Y., Hosseini, P., Kang, J. W., Kang, S., Yang, T. D., Hyeon, M. G., ... Yaqoob, Z. (2018). Reflection phase microscopy using spatio-temporal coherence of light. Optica, 5(11), 1468-1473. https://doi.org/10.1364/OPTICA.5.001468

Reflection phase microscopy using spatio-temporal coherence of light. / Choi, Youngwoon; Hosseini, Poorya; Kang, Jeon Woong; Kang, Sungsam; Yang, Taeseok Daniel; Hyeon, Min Gyu; Kim, Beop-Min; So, Peter T.C.; Yaqoob, Zahid.

In: Optica, Vol. 5, No. 11, 20.11.2018, p. 1468-1473.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Choi, Y, Hosseini, P, Kang, JW, Kang, S, Yang, TD, Hyeon, MG, Kim, B-M, So, PTC & Yaqoob, Z 2018, 'Reflection phase microscopy using spatio-temporal coherence of light', Optica, vol. 5, no. 11, pp. 1468-1473. https://doi.org/10.1364/OPTICA.5.001468
Choi Y, Hosseini P, Kang JW, Kang S, Yang TD, Hyeon MG et al. Reflection phase microscopy using spatio-temporal coherence of light. Optica. 2018 Nov 20;5(11):1468-1473. https://doi.org/10.1364/OPTICA.5.001468
Choi, Youngwoon ; Hosseini, Poorya ; Kang, Jeon Woong ; Kang, Sungsam ; Yang, Taeseok Daniel ; Hyeon, Min Gyu ; Kim, Beop-Min ; So, Peter T.C. ; Yaqoob, Zahid. / Reflection phase microscopy using spatio-temporal coherence of light. In: Optica. 2018 ; Vol. 5, No. 11. pp. 1468-1473.
@article{5182b92f2b074407986c1167f732a42d,
title = "Reflection phase microscopy using spatio-temporal coherence of light",
abstract = "Many disease states are associated with cellular biomechanical changes as markers. Label-free phase microscopes are used to quantify thermally driven interface fluctuations, which allow the deduction of important cellular rheological properties. Here, the spatio-temporal coherence of light was used to implement a high-speed reflection phase microscope with superior depth selectivity and higher phase sensitivity. Nanometric scale motion of cytoplasmic structures can be visualized with fine details and three-dimensional resolution. Specifically, the spontaneous fluctuation occurring on the nuclear membrane of a living cell was observed at video rate. By converting the reflection phase into displacement, the sensitivity in quantifying nuclear membrane fluctuation was found to be about one nanometer. A reflection phase microscope can potentially elucidate biomechanical mechanisms of pathological and physiological processes.",
author = "Youngwoon Choi and Poorya Hosseini and Kang, {Jeon Woong} and Sungsam Kang and Yang, {Taeseok Daniel} and Hyeon, {Min Gyu} and Beop-Min Kim and So, {Peter T.C.} and Zahid Yaqoob",
year = "2018",
month = "11",
day = "20",
doi = "10.1364/OPTICA.5.001468",
language = "English",
volume = "5",
pages = "1468--1473",
journal = "Optica",
issn = "2334-2536",
publisher = "OSA Publishing",
number = "11",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Reflection phase microscopy using spatio-temporal coherence of light

AU - Choi, Youngwoon

AU - Hosseini, Poorya

AU - Kang, Jeon Woong

AU - Kang, Sungsam

AU - Yang, Taeseok Daniel

AU - Hyeon, Min Gyu

AU - Kim, Beop-Min

AU - So, Peter T.C.

AU - Yaqoob, Zahid

PY - 2018/11/20

Y1 - 2018/11/20

N2 - Many disease states are associated with cellular biomechanical changes as markers. Label-free phase microscopes are used to quantify thermally driven interface fluctuations, which allow the deduction of important cellular rheological properties. Here, the spatio-temporal coherence of light was used to implement a high-speed reflection phase microscope with superior depth selectivity and higher phase sensitivity. Nanometric scale motion of cytoplasmic structures can be visualized with fine details and three-dimensional resolution. Specifically, the spontaneous fluctuation occurring on the nuclear membrane of a living cell was observed at video rate. By converting the reflection phase into displacement, the sensitivity in quantifying nuclear membrane fluctuation was found to be about one nanometer. A reflection phase microscope can potentially elucidate biomechanical mechanisms of pathological and physiological processes.

AB - Many disease states are associated with cellular biomechanical changes as markers. Label-free phase microscopes are used to quantify thermally driven interface fluctuations, which allow the deduction of important cellular rheological properties. Here, the spatio-temporal coherence of light was used to implement a high-speed reflection phase microscope with superior depth selectivity and higher phase sensitivity. Nanometric scale motion of cytoplasmic structures can be visualized with fine details and three-dimensional resolution. Specifically, the spontaneous fluctuation occurring on the nuclear membrane of a living cell was observed at video rate. By converting the reflection phase into displacement, the sensitivity in quantifying nuclear membrane fluctuation was found to be about one nanometer. A reflection phase microscope can potentially elucidate biomechanical mechanisms of pathological and physiological processes.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85059028205&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85059028205&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1364/OPTICA.5.001468

DO - 10.1364/OPTICA.5.001468

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:85059028205

VL - 5

SP - 1468

EP - 1473

JO - Optica

JF - Optica

SN - 2334-2536

IS - 11

ER -