Regional glucose metabolism due to the presence of cerebral amyloidopathy in older adults with depression and mild cognitive impairment

Hyun Chul Youn, Eun Seong Lee, Suji Lee, Sang-Il Suh, Hyun-Ghang Jeong, Jae Seon Eo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Depression is a risk factor for mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and for the conversion from MCI to Alzheimer's disease (AD). This study investigated regional cerebral glucose metabolism (rCMglc) in older adults with depression and MCI, either with or without amyloidopathy. Methods: We recruited 31 older adults diagnosed with depression and MCI, and 21 older adults with normal cognition (NC). All participants completed demographic questionnaires and were examined with a standardized neuropsychological battery, F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (PET), and F-18 florbetaben PET. We classified subjects with depression and MCI into amyloid-β-positive (CDAP; n = 16) and amyloid-β-negative (CDAN; n = 15) groups. Pairwise rCMglc analyses were conducted between all three groups (CDAP vs. NC, CDAN vs. NC, and CDAP vs. CDAN). Results: In comparison with the NC group, the CDAP group showed reduced rCMglc predominantly in temporoparietal regions, whereas the CDAN group showed lower rCMglc in regions of the frontal lobe, in addition to the temporoparietal regions. The CDAN group also showed lower rCMglc in right anterior cingulate and left inferior orbitofrontal regions, in a comparison between the CDAP and CDAN groups. Limitations: The generalizability of the findings is limited because this study has a relatively small number of participants. In addition, this study used cross-sectional design rather than longitudinal design. Conclusions: Our findings may provide a reference to assess the risk of future cognitive deterioration. Consequently, this study is expected to contribute to prevention and early identification of dementia associated with AD.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)30-36
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Affective Disorders
Volume239
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018 Oct 15

Fingerprint

Cognition
Depression
Glucose
Amyloid
Positron-Emission Tomography
Alzheimer Disease
Gyrus Cinguli
Fluorodeoxyglucose F18
Frontal Lobe
Prefrontal Cortex
Dementia
Cross-Sectional Studies
Demography
Cognitive Dysfunction

Keywords

  • Alzheimer's disease
  • Amyloid
  • Depression
  • FDG-PET
  • Hypometabolism
  • Mild cognitive impairment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

@article{39318841267c4f00b2afb4e2cee205f3,
title = "Regional glucose metabolism due to the presence of cerebral amyloidopathy in older adults with depression and mild cognitive impairment",
abstract = "Background: Depression is a risk factor for mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and for the conversion from MCI to Alzheimer's disease (AD). This study investigated regional cerebral glucose metabolism (rCMglc) in older adults with depression and MCI, either with or without amyloidopathy. Methods: We recruited 31 older adults diagnosed with depression and MCI, and 21 older adults with normal cognition (NC). All participants completed demographic questionnaires and were examined with a standardized neuropsychological battery, F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (PET), and F-18 florbetaben PET. We classified subjects with depression and MCI into amyloid-β-positive (CDAP; n = 16) and amyloid-β-negative (CDAN; n = 15) groups. Pairwise rCMglc analyses were conducted between all three groups (CDAP vs. NC, CDAN vs. NC, and CDAP vs. CDAN). Results: In comparison with the NC group, the CDAP group showed reduced rCMglc predominantly in temporoparietal regions, whereas the CDAN group showed lower rCMglc in regions of the frontal lobe, in addition to the temporoparietal regions. The CDAN group also showed lower rCMglc in right anterior cingulate and left inferior orbitofrontal regions, in a comparison between the CDAP and CDAN groups. Limitations: The generalizability of the findings is limited because this study has a relatively small number of participants. In addition, this study used cross-sectional design rather than longitudinal design. Conclusions: Our findings may provide a reference to assess the risk of future cognitive deterioration. Consequently, this study is expected to contribute to prevention and early identification of dementia associated with AD.",
keywords = "Alzheimer's disease, Amyloid, Depression, FDG-PET, Hypometabolism, Mild cognitive impairment",
author = "Youn, {Hyun Chul} and Lee, {Eun Seong} and Suji Lee and Sang-Il Suh and Hyun-Ghang Jeong and Eo, {Jae Seon}",
year = "2018",
month = "10",
day = "15",
doi = "10.1016/j.jad.2018.06.029",
language = "English",
volume = "239",
pages = "30--36",
journal = "Journal of Affective Disorders",
issn = "0165-0327",
publisher = "Elsevier",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Regional glucose metabolism due to the presence of cerebral amyloidopathy in older adults with depression and mild cognitive impairment

AU - Youn, Hyun Chul

AU - Lee, Eun Seong

AU - Lee, Suji

AU - Suh, Sang-Il

AU - Jeong, Hyun-Ghang

AU - Eo, Jae Seon

PY - 2018/10/15

Y1 - 2018/10/15

N2 - Background: Depression is a risk factor for mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and for the conversion from MCI to Alzheimer's disease (AD). This study investigated regional cerebral glucose metabolism (rCMglc) in older adults with depression and MCI, either with or without amyloidopathy. Methods: We recruited 31 older adults diagnosed with depression and MCI, and 21 older adults with normal cognition (NC). All participants completed demographic questionnaires and were examined with a standardized neuropsychological battery, F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (PET), and F-18 florbetaben PET. We classified subjects with depression and MCI into amyloid-β-positive (CDAP; n = 16) and amyloid-β-negative (CDAN; n = 15) groups. Pairwise rCMglc analyses were conducted between all three groups (CDAP vs. NC, CDAN vs. NC, and CDAP vs. CDAN). Results: In comparison with the NC group, the CDAP group showed reduced rCMglc predominantly in temporoparietal regions, whereas the CDAN group showed lower rCMglc in regions of the frontal lobe, in addition to the temporoparietal regions. The CDAN group also showed lower rCMglc in right anterior cingulate and left inferior orbitofrontal regions, in a comparison between the CDAP and CDAN groups. Limitations: The generalizability of the findings is limited because this study has a relatively small number of participants. In addition, this study used cross-sectional design rather than longitudinal design. Conclusions: Our findings may provide a reference to assess the risk of future cognitive deterioration. Consequently, this study is expected to contribute to prevention and early identification of dementia associated with AD.

AB - Background: Depression is a risk factor for mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and for the conversion from MCI to Alzheimer's disease (AD). This study investigated regional cerebral glucose metabolism (rCMglc) in older adults with depression and MCI, either with or without amyloidopathy. Methods: We recruited 31 older adults diagnosed with depression and MCI, and 21 older adults with normal cognition (NC). All participants completed demographic questionnaires and were examined with a standardized neuropsychological battery, F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (PET), and F-18 florbetaben PET. We classified subjects with depression and MCI into amyloid-β-positive (CDAP; n = 16) and amyloid-β-negative (CDAN; n = 15) groups. Pairwise rCMglc analyses were conducted between all three groups (CDAP vs. NC, CDAN vs. NC, and CDAP vs. CDAN). Results: In comparison with the NC group, the CDAP group showed reduced rCMglc predominantly in temporoparietal regions, whereas the CDAN group showed lower rCMglc in regions of the frontal lobe, in addition to the temporoparietal regions. The CDAN group also showed lower rCMglc in right anterior cingulate and left inferior orbitofrontal regions, in a comparison between the CDAP and CDAN groups. Limitations: The generalizability of the findings is limited because this study has a relatively small number of participants. In addition, this study used cross-sectional design rather than longitudinal design. Conclusions: Our findings may provide a reference to assess the risk of future cognitive deterioration. Consequently, this study is expected to contribute to prevention and early identification of dementia associated with AD.

KW - Alzheimer's disease

KW - Amyloid

KW - Depression

KW - FDG-PET

KW - Hypometabolism

KW - Mild cognitive impairment

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U2 - 10.1016/j.jad.2018.06.029

DO - 10.1016/j.jad.2018.06.029

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C2 - 29991443

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VL - 239

SP - 30

EP - 36

JO - Journal of Affective Disorders

JF - Journal of Affective Disorders

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