Relationship between physiological tremor and cognitive function in physically active older women

Wonil Park, Bokbeom Kim, Jaesung Lee, Gyuseog Hong, Jonghoon Park

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

[Purpose] This study aimed to compare the physiological tremor, grip strength, and cognitive function of sedentary and physically active older adults. [Methods] Twenty-four older adults aged ≥65 years participated in this study and were divided into the sedentary (76.5±4.4 years, n=12) and physically active (73.5±3.3 years, n=12) groups. Each group completed the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) for cognitive function assessment. Physiological tremor was measured using an accelerometer for both hands at rest and the left/right hand with a 1,000 g dumbbell on the palm in neutral positions and the elbow flexed at 90°. Physical fitness was measured by grip strength and completion of the Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB) and the 6-min walk test. [Results] The physically active group showed a significantly lower level of physiological tremor in both hands at rest and the left/right hand with a 1,000 g dumbbell on the palm (P<0.05) than that in the sedentary group. For cognitive function, the physically active group showed significantly higher scores than those in the sedentary group (P<0.001). No significant correlation was found between cognitive function and left/right grip strength (left: r = 0.117, P = 0.585; right: r = 0.230, P = 0.279), physiological tremor in both hands at rest (left: r = -0.524, P < 0.001; right: r = -0.508, P < 0.05), and the left/right hand with a 1,000 g dumbbell on the palm (left: r = -0.505, P < 0.05; right: r = -0.458, P < 0.05). [Conclusion] Physiological tremor of the hands has the potential to be a useful predictor of cognitive function in older adults.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)14-19
Number of pages6
JournalPhysical Activity and Nutrition
Volume26
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2022 Mar 1

Keywords

  • cognitive function
  • grip strength
  • older adults
  • physically active
  • Physiological tremor
  • sedentary

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Health(social science)
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Relationship between physiological tremor and cognitive function in physically active older women'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this