Relationship between the severity of diversion colitis and the composition of colonic bacteria

A prospective study

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background/Aims: Diversion colitis is the inflammation of the excluded segment of the colon in patients undergoing ostomy. It has been suggested that a change in colonic flora may lead to colitis; however, direct evidence for this disease progression is lacking. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between the severity of diversion colitis and the composition of colonic bacteria. Methsods: We used culture methods and polymerase chain reaction to analyze the colonic microflora of patients who underwent rectal cancer resection with or without diversion ileostomy. In the diversion group, we also evaluated the severity of colonoscopic and pathologic colitis before reversal. Results: This study enrolled 48 patients: 26 in the diversion group and 22 in the control group. Significant differences were observed between the two groups in the levels of Staphylococcus (p=0.038), Enterococcus (p<0.001), Klebsiella (p<0.001), Pseudomonas (p=0.015), Lactobacillus (p=0.038), presence of anaerobes (p=0.019), and Bifidobacterium (p<0.001). A significant correlation between the severity of colitis and bacterial composition was only observed for Bifidobacterium (p=0.005, correlation coefficient=-0.531). Conclusions: The colonic microflora differed significantly between the diversion and control groups. Bifidobacterium was negatively correlated with the severity of diversion colitis.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)170-176
Number of pages7
JournalGut and Liver
Volume8
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014 Jan 1

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Colitis
Prospective Studies
Bacteria
Bifidobacterium
Ostomy
Ileostomy
Control Groups
Klebsiella
Enterococcus
Lactobacillus
Rectal Neoplasms
Pseudomonas
Staphylococcus
Disease Progression
Colon
Inflammation
Polymerase Chain Reaction

Keywords

  • Colonic bacteria
  • Diversion colitis
  • Polymerase chain reaction
  • Rectal neoplasms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology
  • Hepatology

Cite this

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title = "Relationship between the severity of diversion colitis and the composition of colonic bacteria: A prospective study",
abstract = "Background/Aims: Diversion colitis is the inflammation of the excluded segment of the colon in patients undergoing ostomy. It has been suggested that a change in colonic flora may lead to colitis; however, direct evidence for this disease progression is lacking. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between the severity of diversion colitis and the composition of colonic bacteria. Methsods: We used culture methods and polymerase chain reaction to analyze the colonic microflora of patients who underwent rectal cancer resection with or without diversion ileostomy. In the diversion group, we also evaluated the severity of colonoscopic and pathologic colitis before reversal. Results: This study enrolled 48 patients: 26 in the diversion group and 22 in the control group. Significant differences were observed between the two groups in the levels of Staphylococcus (p=0.038), Enterococcus (p<0.001), Klebsiella (p<0.001), Pseudomonas (p=0.015), Lactobacillus (p=0.038), presence of anaerobes (p=0.019), and Bifidobacterium (p<0.001). A significant correlation between the severity of colitis and bacterial composition was only observed for Bifidobacterium (p=0.005, correlation coefficient=-0.531). Conclusions: The colonic microflora differed significantly between the diversion and control groups. Bifidobacterium was negatively correlated with the severity of diversion colitis.",
keywords = "Colonic bacteria, Diversion colitis, Polymerase chain reaction, Rectal neoplasms",
author = "Se-Jin Baek and Kim, {Seon Hahn} and Lee, {Chang Kyu} and Roh, {Kyoung Ho} and Bora Keum and Kim, {Chul Hwan} and Jin Kim",
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T1 - Relationship between the severity of diversion colitis and the composition of colonic bacteria

T2 - A prospective study

AU - Baek, Se-Jin

AU - Kim, Seon Hahn

AU - Lee, Chang Kyu

AU - Roh, Kyoung Ho

AU - Keum, Bora

AU - Kim, Chul Hwan

AU - Kim, Jin

PY - 2014/1/1

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N2 - Background/Aims: Diversion colitis is the inflammation of the excluded segment of the colon in patients undergoing ostomy. It has been suggested that a change in colonic flora may lead to colitis; however, direct evidence for this disease progression is lacking. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between the severity of diversion colitis and the composition of colonic bacteria. Methsods: We used culture methods and polymerase chain reaction to analyze the colonic microflora of patients who underwent rectal cancer resection with or without diversion ileostomy. In the diversion group, we also evaluated the severity of colonoscopic and pathologic colitis before reversal. Results: This study enrolled 48 patients: 26 in the diversion group and 22 in the control group. Significant differences were observed between the two groups in the levels of Staphylococcus (p=0.038), Enterococcus (p<0.001), Klebsiella (p<0.001), Pseudomonas (p=0.015), Lactobacillus (p=0.038), presence of anaerobes (p=0.019), and Bifidobacterium (p<0.001). A significant correlation between the severity of colitis and bacterial composition was only observed for Bifidobacterium (p=0.005, correlation coefficient=-0.531). Conclusions: The colonic microflora differed significantly between the diversion and control groups. Bifidobacterium was negatively correlated with the severity of diversion colitis.

AB - Background/Aims: Diversion colitis is the inflammation of the excluded segment of the colon in patients undergoing ostomy. It has been suggested that a change in colonic flora may lead to colitis; however, direct evidence for this disease progression is lacking. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between the severity of diversion colitis and the composition of colonic bacteria. Methsods: We used culture methods and polymerase chain reaction to analyze the colonic microflora of patients who underwent rectal cancer resection with or without diversion ileostomy. In the diversion group, we also evaluated the severity of colonoscopic and pathologic colitis before reversal. Results: This study enrolled 48 patients: 26 in the diversion group and 22 in the control group. Significant differences were observed between the two groups in the levels of Staphylococcus (p=0.038), Enterococcus (p<0.001), Klebsiella (p<0.001), Pseudomonas (p=0.015), Lactobacillus (p=0.038), presence of anaerobes (p=0.019), and Bifidobacterium (p<0.001). A significant correlation between the severity of colitis and bacterial composition was only observed for Bifidobacterium (p=0.005, correlation coefficient=-0.531). Conclusions: The colonic microflora differed significantly between the diversion and control groups. Bifidobacterium was negatively correlated with the severity of diversion colitis.

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