Relationship between type D personality, symptoms, cancer stigma, and quality of life among patients with lung cancer

Yu Mi Park, Hye Young Kim, Ji Young Kim, Sung Reul Kim, Yeong Hun Choe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: This study aimed to investigate the influence of type D personality on quality of life in patients with lung cancer. Methods: A correlational, cross-sectional research design was used. A convenience sample of 136 patients with lung cancer were recruited from an outpatient pulmonology clinic. Data collection was performed using a structured questionnaire between July and August 2019. Data analyses included descriptive statistics, an independent t-test, a one-way ANOVA, the χ2 test, an ANCOVA, Pearson's correlation coefficients, and hierarchical regression analysis, which were performed using the SPSS WIN 25.0 program. Results: Type D personality was identified in 18.4% of the participants. Patients with type D personality had poorer quality of life and experienced more cancer stigma and more severe symptoms. Type D personality had the strongest association with quality of life among patients with lung cancer, followed by cancer stigma and symptoms. Poor quality of life was associated with non-married status and higher Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group grade. Conclusions: Type D personality, stigma, symptoms, and demographic and clinical factors should be considered when assessing quality of life in patients with lung cancer. Interventions that reflect these factors, including type D personality, may help enhance quality of life for patients with lung cancer in oncology nursing practice.

Original languageEnglish
Article number102098
JournalEuropean Journal of Oncology Nursing
Volume57
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2022 Apr

Keywords

  • Lung cancer
  • Quality of life
  • Stigma
  • Symptoms
  • Type D personality

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology(nursing)

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