Removal of Hazardous Surgical Smoke Using a Built-in-Filter Trocar: A Study in Laparoscopic Rectal Resection

Koo Yong Hahn, Dong Woo Kang, Zairul Azwan Mohd Azman, Se Young Kim, Seon Hahn Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Surgical smoke containing potentially carcinogenic and harmful materials is an inevitable consequence of surgical energy devices, and constitutes a substantial occupational hazard in the operating room. This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of a built-in-filter trocar in eliminating hazardous surgical smoke during laparoscopic and robotic rectal surgery. Methods: Ten patients who underwent rectal cancer resection were enrolled. Five patients underwent surgery utilizing a nonfiltered trocar, and the remaining 5 utilized a built-in-filter trocar. Gas samples were aspirated from the peritoneal cavity over 30 minutes of electrocauterization and collected in a Tedlar bag. Concentrations of surgical smoke were measured using ultraperformance liquid chromatography and gas chromatography. Results: Eleven hazardous chemical compounds (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylene, styrene, formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, propionaldehyde, butyraldehyde, isovaleraldehyde, and valeraldehyde) were identified in the surgical smoke. With the built-in-filter trocar, removal rates of 69% for benzene (P=0.028), 72% for toluene (P=0.009), 67% for butyraldehyde (P=0.047), 46% for ethylbenzene (P=0.092), 44% for xylene (P=0.086), 35% for styrene (P=0.106), 39% for formaldehyde (P=0.346), and 33% for propionaldehyde (P=0.316) were achieved. Conclusions: This study confirmed the presence of harmful materials in surgical smoke. Evacuation of surgical smoke through a disposable built-in-filter trocar is a simple and effective way in reducing volatile organic compounds concentrations.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)341-345
Number of pages5
JournalSurgical Laparoscopy, Endoscopy and Percutaneous Techniques
Volume27
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017 Jan 1

Fingerprint

Surgical Instruments
Smoke
Xylenes
Styrene
Toluene
Benzene
Formaldehyde
Hazardous Substances
Volatile Organic Compounds
Polyethylene Terephthalates
Acetaldehyde
Peritoneal Cavity
Robotics
Operating Rooms
Rectal Neoplasms
Liquid Chromatography
Gas Chromatography
Gases
Equipment and Supplies

Keywords

  • laparoscopy
  • micropore filter
  • smoke
  • trocar

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Removal of Hazardous Surgical Smoke Using a Built-in-Filter Trocar : A Study in Laparoscopic Rectal Resection. / Hahn, Koo Yong; Kang, Dong Woo; Azman, Zairul Azwan Mohd; Kim, Se Young; Kim, Seon Hahn.

In: Surgical Laparoscopy, Endoscopy and Percutaneous Techniques, Vol. 27, No. 5, 01.01.2017, p. 341-345.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{b26a3335ac3d422081893692711b3cc7,
title = "Removal of Hazardous Surgical Smoke Using a Built-in-Filter Trocar: A Study in Laparoscopic Rectal Resection",
abstract = "Background: Surgical smoke containing potentially carcinogenic and harmful materials is an inevitable consequence of surgical energy devices, and constitutes a substantial occupational hazard in the operating room. This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of a built-in-filter trocar in eliminating hazardous surgical smoke during laparoscopic and robotic rectal surgery. Methods: Ten patients who underwent rectal cancer resection were enrolled. Five patients underwent surgery utilizing a nonfiltered trocar, and the remaining 5 utilized a built-in-filter trocar. Gas samples were aspirated from the peritoneal cavity over 30 minutes of electrocauterization and collected in a Tedlar bag. Concentrations of surgical smoke were measured using ultraperformance liquid chromatography and gas chromatography. Results: Eleven hazardous chemical compounds (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylene, styrene, formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, propionaldehyde, butyraldehyde, isovaleraldehyde, and valeraldehyde) were identified in the surgical smoke. With the built-in-filter trocar, removal rates of 69{\%} for benzene (P=0.028), 72{\%} for toluene (P=0.009), 67{\%} for butyraldehyde (P=0.047), 46{\%} for ethylbenzene (P=0.092), 44{\%} for xylene (P=0.086), 35{\%} for styrene (P=0.106), 39{\%} for formaldehyde (P=0.346), and 33{\%} for propionaldehyde (P=0.316) were achieved. Conclusions: This study confirmed the presence of harmful materials in surgical smoke. Evacuation of surgical smoke through a disposable built-in-filter trocar is a simple and effective way in reducing volatile organic compounds concentrations.",
keywords = "laparoscopy, micropore filter, smoke, trocar",
author = "Hahn, {Koo Yong} and Kang, {Dong Woo} and Azman, {Zairul Azwan Mohd} and Kim, {Se Young} and Kim, {Seon Hahn}",
year = "2017",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1097/SLE.0000000000000459",
language = "English",
volume = "27",
pages = "341--345",
journal = "Surgical Laparoscopy, Endoscopy and Percutaneous Techniques",
issn = "1530-4515",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Removal of Hazardous Surgical Smoke Using a Built-in-Filter Trocar

T2 - A Study in Laparoscopic Rectal Resection

AU - Hahn, Koo Yong

AU - Kang, Dong Woo

AU - Azman, Zairul Azwan Mohd

AU - Kim, Se Young

AU - Kim, Seon Hahn

PY - 2017/1/1

Y1 - 2017/1/1

N2 - Background: Surgical smoke containing potentially carcinogenic and harmful materials is an inevitable consequence of surgical energy devices, and constitutes a substantial occupational hazard in the operating room. This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of a built-in-filter trocar in eliminating hazardous surgical smoke during laparoscopic and robotic rectal surgery. Methods: Ten patients who underwent rectal cancer resection were enrolled. Five patients underwent surgery utilizing a nonfiltered trocar, and the remaining 5 utilized a built-in-filter trocar. Gas samples were aspirated from the peritoneal cavity over 30 minutes of electrocauterization and collected in a Tedlar bag. Concentrations of surgical smoke were measured using ultraperformance liquid chromatography and gas chromatography. Results: Eleven hazardous chemical compounds (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylene, styrene, formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, propionaldehyde, butyraldehyde, isovaleraldehyde, and valeraldehyde) were identified in the surgical smoke. With the built-in-filter trocar, removal rates of 69% for benzene (P=0.028), 72% for toluene (P=0.009), 67% for butyraldehyde (P=0.047), 46% for ethylbenzene (P=0.092), 44% for xylene (P=0.086), 35% for styrene (P=0.106), 39% for formaldehyde (P=0.346), and 33% for propionaldehyde (P=0.316) were achieved. Conclusions: This study confirmed the presence of harmful materials in surgical smoke. Evacuation of surgical smoke through a disposable built-in-filter trocar is a simple and effective way in reducing volatile organic compounds concentrations.

AB - Background: Surgical smoke containing potentially carcinogenic and harmful materials is an inevitable consequence of surgical energy devices, and constitutes a substantial occupational hazard in the operating room. This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of a built-in-filter trocar in eliminating hazardous surgical smoke during laparoscopic and robotic rectal surgery. Methods: Ten patients who underwent rectal cancer resection were enrolled. Five patients underwent surgery utilizing a nonfiltered trocar, and the remaining 5 utilized a built-in-filter trocar. Gas samples were aspirated from the peritoneal cavity over 30 minutes of electrocauterization and collected in a Tedlar bag. Concentrations of surgical smoke were measured using ultraperformance liquid chromatography and gas chromatography. Results: Eleven hazardous chemical compounds (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylene, styrene, formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, propionaldehyde, butyraldehyde, isovaleraldehyde, and valeraldehyde) were identified in the surgical smoke. With the built-in-filter trocar, removal rates of 69% for benzene (P=0.028), 72% for toluene (P=0.009), 67% for butyraldehyde (P=0.047), 46% for ethylbenzene (P=0.092), 44% for xylene (P=0.086), 35% for styrene (P=0.106), 39% for formaldehyde (P=0.346), and 33% for propionaldehyde (P=0.316) were achieved. Conclusions: This study confirmed the presence of harmful materials in surgical smoke. Evacuation of surgical smoke through a disposable built-in-filter trocar is a simple and effective way in reducing volatile organic compounds concentrations.

KW - laparoscopy

KW - micropore filter

KW - smoke

KW - trocar

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85030986653&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85030986653&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1097/SLE.0000000000000459

DO - 10.1097/SLE.0000000000000459

M3 - Article

C2 - 28902038

AN - SCOPUS:85030986653

VL - 27

SP - 341

EP - 345

JO - Surgical Laparoscopy, Endoscopy and Percutaneous Techniques

JF - Surgical Laparoscopy, Endoscopy and Percutaneous Techniques

SN - 1530-4515

IS - 5

ER -