Risk factors and outcomes of acute renal infarction

Jihyun Yang, Jun Yong Lee, Young Ju Na, Sung Yoon Lim, Myung-Gyu Kim, Sang Kyung Jo, Won Yong Cho

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background Renal infarction (RI) is an uncommon disease that is difficult to diagnose. As little is known about clinical characteristics of this disease, we investigated its underlying risk factors and outcomes. Methods We performed a retrospective single-center study of 89 patients newly diagnosed with acute RI between January 2002 and March 2015 using imaging modalities. Clinical features, possible etiologies, and long-term renal outcome data were reviewed. Results The patients' mean age was 63.5 ± 15.42 years; 23.6% had diabetes and 56.2% had hypertension. Unilateral and bilateral involvements were shown in 80.9% and 19.1% of patients, respectively; proteinuria and hematuria were reported in 40.4% and 41.6%, respectively. Cardiovascular disease was the most common underlying disease, followed by renal vascular injury and hypercoagulability disorder. Fourteen patients had no specific underlying disease. At the time of diagnosis, acute kidney injury (AKI) was found in 34.8% of patients. Univariate analysis revealed diabetes mellitus (DM), leukocytosis, and high C-reactive protein (CRP) as significant risk factors for the development of AKI. On multivariate analysis, DM and high CRP levels were independent predictors for AKI. During follow-up, chronic kidney disease developed in 27.4% of patients. Univariate and multivariate Cox regression analyses showed old age to be an independent risk factor for this disease, whereas AKI history was a negative risk factor. Conclusion DM patients or those with high CRP levels should be observed for renal function deterioration. Clinicians should also monitor for RI in elderly patients.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)90-95
Number of pages6
JournalKidney Research and Clinical Practice
Volume35
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016 Jun 1

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Infarction
Kidney
Acute Kidney Injury
C-Reactive Protein
Diabetes Mellitus
Thrombophilia
Vascular System Injuries
Leukocytosis
Hematuria
Chronic Renal Insufficiency
Proteinuria
Cardiovascular Diseases
Multivariate Analysis
Regression Analysis
Hypertension

Keywords

  • Acute kidney injury
  • Chronic kidney disease
  • Infarction
  • Renal artery

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nephrology
  • Urology

Cite this

Risk factors and outcomes of acute renal infarction. / Yang, Jihyun; Lee, Jun Yong; Na, Young Ju; Lim, Sung Yoon; Kim, Myung-Gyu; Jo, Sang Kyung; Cho, Won Yong.

In: Kidney Research and Clinical Practice, Vol. 35, No. 2, 01.06.2016, p. 90-95.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Yang, Jihyun ; Lee, Jun Yong ; Na, Young Ju ; Lim, Sung Yoon ; Kim, Myung-Gyu ; Jo, Sang Kyung ; Cho, Won Yong. / Risk factors and outcomes of acute renal infarction. In: Kidney Research and Clinical Practice. 2016 ; Vol. 35, No. 2. pp. 90-95.
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abstract = "Background Renal infarction (RI) is an uncommon disease that is difficult to diagnose. As little is known about clinical characteristics of this disease, we investigated its underlying risk factors and outcomes. Methods We performed a retrospective single-center study of 89 patients newly diagnosed with acute RI between January 2002 and March 2015 using imaging modalities. Clinical features, possible etiologies, and long-term renal outcome data were reviewed. Results The patients' mean age was 63.5 ± 15.42 years; 23.6{\%} had diabetes and 56.2{\%} had hypertension. Unilateral and bilateral involvements were shown in 80.9{\%} and 19.1{\%} of patients, respectively; proteinuria and hematuria were reported in 40.4{\%} and 41.6{\%}, respectively. Cardiovascular disease was the most common underlying disease, followed by renal vascular injury and hypercoagulability disorder. Fourteen patients had no specific underlying disease. At the time of diagnosis, acute kidney injury (AKI) was found in 34.8{\%} of patients. Univariate analysis revealed diabetes mellitus (DM), leukocytosis, and high C-reactive protein (CRP) as significant risk factors for the development of AKI. On multivariate analysis, DM and high CRP levels were independent predictors for AKI. During follow-up, chronic kidney disease developed in 27.4{\%} of patients. Univariate and multivariate Cox regression analyses showed old age to be an independent risk factor for this disease, whereas AKI history was a negative risk factor. Conclusion DM patients or those with high CRP levels should be observed for renal function deterioration. Clinicians should also monitor for RI in elderly patients.",
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N2 - Background Renal infarction (RI) is an uncommon disease that is difficult to diagnose. As little is known about clinical characteristics of this disease, we investigated its underlying risk factors and outcomes. Methods We performed a retrospective single-center study of 89 patients newly diagnosed with acute RI between January 2002 and March 2015 using imaging modalities. Clinical features, possible etiologies, and long-term renal outcome data were reviewed. Results The patients' mean age was 63.5 ± 15.42 years; 23.6% had diabetes and 56.2% had hypertension. Unilateral and bilateral involvements were shown in 80.9% and 19.1% of patients, respectively; proteinuria and hematuria were reported in 40.4% and 41.6%, respectively. Cardiovascular disease was the most common underlying disease, followed by renal vascular injury and hypercoagulability disorder. Fourteen patients had no specific underlying disease. At the time of diagnosis, acute kidney injury (AKI) was found in 34.8% of patients. Univariate analysis revealed diabetes mellitus (DM), leukocytosis, and high C-reactive protein (CRP) as significant risk factors for the development of AKI. On multivariate analysis, DM and high CRP levels were independent predictors for AKI. During follow-up, chronic kidney disease developed in 27.4% of patients. Univariate and multivariate Cox regression analyses showed old age to be an independent risk factor for this disease, whereas AKI history was a negative risk factor. Conclusion DM patients or those with high CRP levels should be observed for renal function deterioration. Clinicians should also monitor for RI in elderly patients.

AB - Background Renal infarction (RI) is an uncommon disease that is difficult to diagnose. As little is known about clinical characteristics of this disease, we investigated its underlying risk factors and outcomes. Methods We performed a retrospective single-center study of 89 patients newly diagnosed with acute RI between January 2002 and March 2015 using imaging modalities. Clinical features, possible etiologies, and long-term renal outcome data were reviewed. Results The patients' mean age was 63.5 ± 15.42 years; 23.6% had diabetes and 56.2% had hypertension. Unilateral and bilateral involvements were shown in 80.9% and 19.1% of patients, respectively; proteinuria and hematuria were reported in 40.4% and 41.6%, respectively. Cardiovascular disease was the most common underlying disease, followed by renal vascular injury and hypercoagulability disorder. Fourteen patients had no specific underlying disease. At the time of diagnosis, acute kidney injury (AKI) was found in 34.8% of patients. Univariate analysis revealed diabetes mellitus (DM), leukocytosis, and high C-reactive protein (CRP) as significant risk factors for the development of AKI. On multivariate analysis, DM and high CRP levels were independent predictors for AKI. During follow-up, chronic kidney disease developed in 27.4% of patients. Univariate and multivariate Cox regression analyses showed old age to be an independent risk factor for this disease, whereas AKI history was a negative risk factor. Conclusion DM patients or those with high CRP levels should be observed for renal function deterioration. Clinicians should also monitor for RI in elderly patients.

KW - Acute kidney injury

KW - Chronic kidney disease

KW - Infarction

KW - Renal artery

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