Role of severity and gender in the association between late-life depression and all-cause mortality

Hyun-Ghang Jeong, Jung Jae Lee, Seok Bum Lee, Joon Hyuk Park, Yoonseok Huh, Ji Won Han, Tae Hui Kim, Ho Jun Chin, Ki Woong Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Mortality associated with depression may be influenced by severity of depression and gender. We investigated the differential impacts on all-cause mortality of late-life depression by the type of depression (major depressive disorder, MDD; minor depressive disorder, MnDD; subsyndromal depression, SSD) and gender after adjusting comorbid conditions in the randomly sampled elderly. Methods: One thousand community-dwelling elderly individuals were enrolled. Standardized face-to-face clinical interviews, neurological examination, and physical examination were conducted to diagnose depressive disorders and comorbid cognitive disorders. Depressive disorders were diagnosed according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-IV (DSM-IV) criteria and SSD to study-specific operational criteria. Five-year survivals were compared between groups using Cox proportional hazards models. Results: By the end of 2010, 174 subjects (17.4%) died. Depressive disorder (p = 0.001) and its interaction term with gender (p < 0.001) were significant in predicting five-year survival. MDD was an independent risk factor for mortality in men (hazard ratio = 3.65, 95% confidence interval = 1.67-7.96) whereas MnDD and SSD were not when other risk factors were adjusted. Conclusions: MDD may directly confer the risk of mortality in elderly men whereas non-major depression may be just an indicator of increased mortality in both genders.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)677-684
Number of pages8
JournalInternational Psychogeriatrics
Volume25
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013 Apr 1

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Silver Sulfadiazine
Depression
Depressive Disorder
Mortality
Independent Living
Survival
Major Depressive Disorder
Neurologic Examination
Proportional Hazards Models
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Physical Examination
Confidence Intervals
Interviews

Keywords

  • gender
  • late-life depression
  • major depressive disorder
  • minor depressive disorder
  • mortality
  • subsyndromal depression

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Gerontology
  • Clinical Psychology

Cite this

Role of severity and gender in the association between late-life depression and all-cause mortality. / Jeong, Hyun-Ghang; Lee, Jung Jae; Lee, Seok Bum; Park, Joon Hyuk; Huh, Yoonseok; Han, Ji Won; Kim, Tae Hui; Chin, Ho Jun; Kim, Ki Woong.

In: International Psychogeriatrics, Vol. 25, No. 4, 01.04.2013, p. 677-684.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Jeong, Hyun-Ghang ; Lee, Jung Jae ; Lee, Seok Bum ; Park, Joon Hyuk ; Huh, Yoonseok ; Han, Ji Won ; Kim, Tae Hui ; Chin, Ho Jun ; Kim, Ki Woong. / Role of severity and gender in the association between late-life depression and all-cause mortality. In: International Psychogeriatrics. 2013 ; Vol. 25, No. 4. pp. 677-684.
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