Rufinamide as an adjuvant treatment in children with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome

Shin Hye Kim, So-Hee Eun, Hoon Chul Kang, Eun Ji Kwon, Jung Hye Byeon, Young Mock Lee, Joon Soo Lee, Baik-Lin Eun, Heung Dong Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of rufinamide as an add-on treatment in children and adolescents with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome (LGS). Methods: The study was an open-label, observational clinical trial of rufinamide as an add-on treatment in intractable LGS patients. This intent-to-treat trial included 4 weeks of scheduled titrated doses and a 12-week maintenance phase with a target dose of 20-40 mg/kg rufinamide, adjusted according to its effectiveness and tolerability after a baseline period of 4 weeks. The primary outcome was measured by the seizure-reduction rate according to individual seizure type over the 12-week maintenance period. Results: One hundred and twenty-eight patients with LGS who were determined to be unresponsive to one or more antiepileptic drugs or dietary therapy were enrolled. Of the 128 patients enrolled, 112 (87.5%) completed the study. After add-on rufinamide treatment, 46 patients (35.9%) achieved a more than 50% reduction in seizure frequency and 10 (7.8%) patients became seizure-free. When we identified those who responded with an at least 50% reduction in seizure frequency, 39.4% of the responders reported reductions in convulsive seizures, 36.4% in drop attacks, 33.3% in myoclonic seizures, and 20.0% in epileptic spasms. Overall, 32.8% of patients reported adverse effects, which were mostly mild and transient in nature. The most common adverse effects were fatigue (15 patients, 11.7%) and poor appetite (9 patients, 7.0%). Twenty-one (16.4%) patients experienced an increased seizure frequency. Conclusions: Rufinamide appears to be a safe and effective adjuvant treatment for many cases of intractable LGS.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)288-291
Number of pages4
JournalSeizure
Volume21
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012 May 1

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Seizures
Therapeutics
Maintenance
rufinamide
Lennox Gastaut Syndrome
Spasm
Syncope
Appetite
Anticonvulsants
Fatigue
Clinical Trials

Keywords

  • Child
  • Lennox-Gastaut syndrome
  • Rufinamide

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Rufinamide as an adjuvant treatment in children with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome. / Kim, Shin Hye; Eun, So-Hee; Kang, Hoon Chul; Kwon, Eun Ji; Byeon, Jung Hye; Lee, Young Mock; Lee, Joon Soo; Eun, Baik-Lin; Kim, Heung Dong.

In: Seizure, Vol. 21, No. 4, 01.05.2012, p. 288-291.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kim, Shin Hye ; Eun, So-Hee ; Kang, Hoon Chul ; Kwon, Eun Ji ; Byeon, Jung Hye ; Lee, Young Mock ; Lee, Joon Soo ; Eun, Baik-Lin ; Kim, Heung Dong. / Rufinamide as an adjuvant treatment in children with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome. In: Seizure. 2012 ; Vol. 21, No. 4. pp. 288-291.
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