Safety and efficacy of medium-sized particle embolisation for skull-base meningioma

K. I. Jo, Byungjun Kim, M. J. Cha, J. H. Choi, P. Jeon, K. H. Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Aim To determine the effectiveness and safety of preoperative tumour embolisation for skull-base meningiomas via external carotid artery (ECA) feeders using medium-sized (150-250 μm) polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) particles. Materials and methods This study included 114 consecutive patients with skull-base meningiomas who underwent preoperative tumour embolisation using medium-sized PVA particles from January 2004 to December 2013. Tumours were categorised according to feeding artery as follows: type 1, tumour staining at ECA angiography only; type 2, tumour staining at both the ECA and internal carotid artery (ICA) angiography; or type 3, little or no tumour staining at ECA angiography. The effectiveness was based on the percent reduction in the enhanced area: >75% was considered effective, 25-75% was considered partially effective, and <25% was considered ineffective. Results Tumour embolisation was performed in patients with dominant feeding vessels originating from the ECA. Procedural-related complications occurred in two (1.8%) patients. Post-procedural MRI images were available for 51 patients, which revealed effective embolisation in only 13 (25.5%) patients. Identification of an ICA feeding vessel was associated with ineffective embolisation (p=0.011). Effective embolisation was associated with low estimated blood loss during surgery. Conclusion ECA embolisation using medium-sized PVA is ineffective in patients in whom a definitive ICA feeding vessel was identified, even if preprocedural angiography showed that the dominant feeder originated from the ECA. When the risks of surgical morbidity and mortality are expected to be high, ICA feeder embolisation should also be considered.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)335-340
Number of pages6
JournalClinical Radiology
Volume71
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016 Apr 1

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External Carotid Artery
Skull Base
Meningioma
Safety
Internal Carotid Artery
Polyvinyl Alcohol
Angiography
Neoplasms
Staining and Labeling
Arteries
Morbidity
Mortality

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

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Safety and efficacy of medium-sized particle embolisation for skull-base meningioma. / Jo, K. I.; Kim, Byungjun; Cha, M. J.; Choi, J. H.; Jeon, P.; Kim, K. H.

In: Clinical Radiology, Vol. 71, No. 4, 01.04.2016, p. 335-340.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Jo, K. I. ; Kim, Byungjun ; Cha, M. J. ; Choi, J. H. ; Jeon, P. ; Kim, K. H. / Safety and efficacy of medium-sized particle embolisation for skull-base meningioma. In: Clinical Radiology. 2016 ; Vol. 71, No. 4. pp. 335-340.
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abstract = "Aim To determine the effectiveness and safety of preoperative tumour embolisation for skull-base meningiomas via external carotid artery (ECA) feeders using medium-sized (150-250 μm) polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) particles. Materials and methods This study included 114 consecutive patients with skull-base meningiomas who underwent preoperative tumour embolisation using medium-sized PVA particles from January 2004 to December 2013. Tumours were categorised according to feeding artery as follows: type 1, tumour staining at ECA angiography only; type 2, tumour staining at both the ECA and internal carotid artery (ICA) angiography; or type 3, little or no tumour staining at ECA angiography. The effectiveness was based on the percent reduction in the enhanced area: >75{\%} was considered effective, 25-75{\%} was considered partially effective, and <25{\%} was considered ineffective. Results Tumour embolisation was performed in patients with dominant feeding vessels originating from the ECA. Procedural-related complications occurred in two (1.8{\%}) patients. Post-procedural MRI images were available for 51 patients, which revealed effective embolisation in only 13 (25.5{\%}) patients. Identification of an ICA feeding vessel was associated with ineffective embolisation (p=0.011). Effective embolisation was associated with low estimated blood loss during surgery. Conclusion ECA embolisation using medium-sized PVA is ineffective in patients in whom a definitive ICA feeding vessel was identified, even if preprocedural angiography showed that the dominant feeder originated from the ECA. When the risks of surgical morbidity and mortality are expected to be high, ICA feeder embolisation should also be considered.",
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N2 - Aim To determine the effectiveness and safety of preoperative tumour embolisation for skull-base meningiomas via external carotid artery (ECA) feeders using medium-sized (150-250 μm) polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) particles. Materials and methods This study included 114 consecutive patients with skull-base meningiomas who underwent preoperative tumour embolisation using medium-sized PVA particles from January 2004 to December 2013. Tumours were categorised according to feeding artery as follows: type 1, tumour staining at ECA angiography only; type 2, tumour staining at both the ECA and internal carotid artery (ICA) angiography; or type 3, little or no tumour staining at ECA angiography. The effectiveness was based on the percent reduction in the enhanced area: >75% was considered effective, 25-75% was considered partially effective, and <25% was considered ineffective. Results Tumour embolisation was performed in patients with dominant feeding vessels originating from the ECA. Procedural-related complications occurred in two (1.8%) patients. Post-procedural MRI images were available for 51 patients, which revealed effective embolisation in only 13 (25.5%) patients. Identification of an ICA feeding vessel was associated with ineffective embolisation (p=0.011). Effective embolisation was associated with low estimated blood loss during surgery. Conclusion ECA embolisation using medium-sized PVA is ineffective in patients in whom a definitive ICA feeding vessel was identified, even if preprocedural angiography showed that the dominant feeder originated from the ECA. When the risks of surgical morbidity and mortality are expected to be high, ICA feeder embolisation should also be considered.

AB - Aim To determine the effectiveness and safety of preoperative tumour embolisation for skull-base meningiomas via external carotid artery (ECA) feeders using medium-sized (150-250 μm) polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) particles. Materials and methods This study included 114 consecutive patients with skull-base meningiomas who underwent preoperative tumour embolisation using medium-sized PVA particles from January 2004 to December 2013. Tumours were categorised according to feeding artery as follows: type 1, tumour staining at ECA angiography only; type 2, tumour staining at both the ECA and internal carotid artery (ICA) angiography; or type 3, little or no tumour staining at ECA angiography. The effectiveness was based on the percent reduction in the enhanced area: >75% was considered effective, 25-75% was considered partially effective, and <25% was considered ineffective. Results Tumour embolisation was performed in patients with dominant feeding vessels originating from the ECA. Procedural-related complications occurred in two (1.8%) patients. Post-procedural MRI images were available for 51 patients, which revealed effective embolisation in only 13 (25.5%) patients. Identification of an ICA feeding vessel was associated with ineffective embolisation (p=0.011). Effective embolisation was associated with low estimated blood loss during surgery. Conclusion ECA embolisation using medium-sized PVA is ineffective in patients in whom a definitive ICA feeding vessel was identified, even if preprocedural angiography showed that the dominant feeder originated from the ECA. When the risks of surgical morbidity and mortality are expected to be high, ICA feeder embolisation should also be considered.

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