Schooling, health knowledge and obesity

Rodolfo M. Nayga, Jr

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

55 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The connection between schooling and health is well documented. An important empirical issue that needs to be examined, however, is whether schooling's effects are due to individual health knowledge differences. This empirical study examines this issue with an increasingly important health indicator, obesity. Since provision of health knowledge is a major tool of public agencies promoting health, this empirical study uses a new direct measure of health knowledge to test this hypothesis. The results show that knowledge is inversely related to the probability that an individual is obese. Schooling's effects on relative weight and the probability of being obese are explained by differences in knowledge. This result may imply that schooling's effect on the allocative efficiency of the household production of health is the main reason schooling is linked to health behaviour. The result also may imply that the most effective method of health education is to highlight the disease element of poor dietary habits and health. More importantly, the simulations conducted suggest positive returns to knowledge based on improvements in the probability estimates.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)815-822
Number of pages8
JournalApplied Economics
Volume32
Issue number7
Publication statusPublished - 2000 Jan 1
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Obesity
Schooling
Health
Empirical study
Household production
Health indicators
Public agencies
Allocative efficiency
Hypothesis test
Knowledge-based
Health education
Relative weight
Habit
Simulation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Economics and Econometrics

Cite this

Nayga, Jr, R. M. (2000). Schooling, health knowledge and obesity. Applied Economics, 32(7), 815-822.

Schooling, health knowledge and obesity. / Nayga, Jr, Rodolfo M.

In: Applied Economics, Vol. 32, No. 7, 01.01.2000, p. 815-822.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Nayga, Jr, RM 2000, 'Schooling, health knowledge and obesity', Applied Economics, vol. 32, no. 7, pp. 815-822.
Nayga, Jr RM. Schooling, health knowledge and obesity. Applied Economics. 2000 Jan 1;32(7):815-822.
Nayga, Jr, Rodolfo M. / Schooling, health knowledge and obesity. In: Applied Economics. 2000 ; Vol. 32, No. 7. pp. 815-822.
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