Secondary radiation doses of intensity-modulated radiotherapy and proton beam therapy in patients with lung and liver cancer

Seonkyu Kim, Byung Jun Min, Myonggeun Yoon, Jinsung Kim, Dong Ho Shin, Se Byeong Lee, Sung Yong Park, Sungkoo Cho, Dae Hyun Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: To compare the secondary radiation doses following intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and proton beam therapy (PBT) in patients with lung and liver cancer. Methods and materials: IMRT and PBT were planned for three lung cancer and three liver cancer patients. The treatment beams were delivered to phantoms and the corresponding secondary doses during irradiation were measured at various points 20-50 cm from the beam isocenter using ion chamber and CR-39 detectors for IMRT and PBT, respectively. Results: The secondary dose per Gy (i.e., a treatment dose of 1 Gy) from PBT for lung and liver cancer, measured 20-50 cm from the isocenter, ranged from 0.17 to 0.086 mGy. The secondary dose per Gy from IMRT, however, ranged between 5.8 and 1.0 mGy, indicating that PBT is associated with a smaller dose of secondary radiation than IMRT. The internal neutron dose per Gy from PBT for lung and liver cancer, 20-50 cm from the isocenter, ranged from 0.03 to 0.008 mGy. Conclusions: The secondary dose from PBT is less than or compatible to the secondary dose from conventional IMRT. The internal neutron dose generated by the interaction between protons and body material is generally much less than the external neutron dose from the treatment head.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)335-339
Number of pages5
JournalRadiotherapy and Oncology
Volume98
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011 Mar
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • IMRT
  • Neutron
  • Proton
  • Secondary dose

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology
  • Oncology
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

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