Sedentary behaviour and biomarkers for cardiovascular disease and diabetes in mid-life: the role of television-viewing and sitting at work.

Snehal M. Pereira, Myung Ki, Chris Power

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

83 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Knowledge of sedentary behaviour associations with health has relied mainly on television-viewing as a proxy and studies with other measures are less common. To clarify whether sedentary behaviour is associated with disease-risk, we examined associations for television-viewing and sitting at work. Using the 1958 British birth cohort (n = 7660), we analysed cross-sectional associations between television-viewing and work sitting (four categories, 0-1 to ≥ 3 h/d) with total, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) and low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol, triglycerides, blood pressure, glycated haemoglobin, fibrinogen, C-reactive protein, hypertension and metabolic syndrome at 45 y. We adjusted for lifestyle and socio-demographic factors and assessed mediation of associations by body mass index (BMI) and diet. We also assessed whether the sedentary indicators are related similarly to factors linked to disease-risk. There was a general trend of adverse socio-demographic and lifestyle characteristics with higher h/d television-viewing, but trends in the opposite direction for work sitting. Television-viewing was associated with most biomarkers and associations were mediated by BMI: e.g. for each category increase in television-viewing, HDL-cholesterol in men was lower by 2.3% (95% CI: 1.5%, 3.2%) and, in BMI and diet adjusted analyses, by 1.6% (0.8%, 2.4%); for women, by 2.0% (1.2%, 2.9%) and 0.9% (0.1%, 1.6%) respectively. Few, weaker associations for work sitting were found, in men only: e.g. corresponding values for HDL-cholesterol were 1.2% (0.5%, 1.9%) and 0.9% (0.3%, 1.5%). Odds for metabolic syndrome were elevated by 82% and 33% respectively for men watching television or work sitting for ≥ 3 vs. 0-1 h/d. Associations with cardiovascular disease and diabetes biomarkers in mid-adulthood differed for television-viewing and work sitting. The role of sedentary behaviour may vary by leisure and work domains or the two indicators reflect differing associations with other disease-related influences.

Original languageEnglish
JournalPLoS One
Volume7
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012 Aug 2
Externally publishedYes

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television
Television
Biomarkers
Medical problems
cardiovascular diseases
diabetes
biomarkers
Cardiovascular Diseases
body mass index
Body Mass Index
metabolic syndrome
Nutrition
high density lipoprotein cholesterol
HDL Cholesterol
lifestyle
Life Style
demographic statistics
Hemoglobin C
Demography
Diet

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Cite this

Sedentary behaviour and biomarkers for cardiovascular disease and diabetes in mid-life : the role of television-viewing and sitting at work. / Pereira, Snehal M.; Ki, Myung; Power, Chris.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 7, No. 2, 02.08.2012.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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