Sensory electrical stimulation for suppression of postural tremor in patients with essential tremor

Jae Hoon Heo, Ji Won Kim, Yuri Kwon, Sang Ki Lee, Gwang Moon Eom, Do-Young Kwon, Chan Nyeong Lee, Kun Woo Park, Mario Manto

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Essential tremor is an involuntary trembling of body limbs in people without tremor-related disease. In previous study, suppression of tremor by sensory electrical stimulation was confirmed on the index finger. This study investigates the effect of sensory stimulation on multiple segments and joints of the upper limb. It denotes the observation regarding the effect's continuity after halting the stimulation. 18 patients with essential tremor (8 men and 10 women) participated in this study. The task, "arms stretched forward", was performed and sensory electrical stimulation was applied on four muscles of the upper limb (Flexor Carpi Radialis, Extensor Carpi Radialis, Biceps Brachii, and Triceps Brachii) for 15 seconds. Three 3-D gyro sensors were used to measure the angular velocities of segments (finger, hand, and forearm) and joints (metacarpophalangeal and wrist joints) for three phases of pre-stimulation (Pre), during-stimulation (On), and 5 minute post-stimulation (P5). Three characteristic variables of root-mean-squared angular velocity, peak power, and peak power frequency were derived from the vector sum of the sensor signals. At On phase, RMS velocity was reduced from Pre in all segments and joints while peak power was reduced from Pre in all segments and joints except for forearm segment. Sensory stimulation showed no effect on peak power frequency. All variables at P5 were similar to those at On at all segments and joints. The decrease of peak power of the index finger was noted by 90% during stimulation from that of On phase, which was maintained even after 5 min. The results indicate that sensory stimulation may be an effective clinical method to treat the essential tremor.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)S803-S809
JournalBio-Medical Materials and Engineering
Volume26
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015 Jan 1

Fingerprint

Angular velocity
Phase velocity
Sensors
Muscle

Keywords

  • arms stretched forward
  • Essential tremor
  • gyro sensor
  • postural tremor
  • sensory stimulation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biomaterials
  • Biomedical Engineering

Cite this

Sensory electrical stimulation for suppression of postural tremor in patients with essential tremor. / Heo, Jae Hoon; Kim, Ji Won; Kwon, Yuri; Lee, Sang Ki; Eom, Gwang Moon; Kwon, Do-Young; Lee, Chan Nyeong; Park, Kun Woo; Manto, Mario.

In: Bio-Medical Materials and Engineering, Vol. 26, 01.01.2015, p. S803-S809.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Heo, Jae Hoon ; Kim, Ji Won ; Kwon, Yuri ; Lee, Sang Ki ; Eom, Gwang Moon ; Kwon, Do-Young ; Lee, Chan Nyeong ; Park, Kun Woo ; Manto, Mario. / Sensory electrical stimulation for suppression of postural tremor in patients with essential tremor. In: Bio-Medical Materials and Engineering. 2015 ; Vol. 26. pp. S803-S809.
@article{6f0dec8fbefe42ef81f794b676bc2b6f,
title = "Sensory electrical stimulation for suppression of postural tremor in patients with essential tremor",
abstract = "Essential tremor is an involuntary trembling of body limbs in people without tremor-related disease. In previous study, suppression of tremor by sensory electrical stimulation was confirmed on the index finger. This study investigates the effect of sensory stimulation on multiple segments and joints of the upper limb. It denotes the observation regarding the effect's continuity after halting the stimulation. 18 patients with essential tremor (8 men and 10 women) participated in this study. The task, {"}arms stretched forward{"}, was performed and sensory electrical stimulation was applied on four muscles of the upper limb (Flexor Carpi Radialis, Extensor Carpi Radialis, Biceps Brachii, and Triceps Brachii) for 15 seconds. Three 3-D gyro sensors were used to measure the angular velocities of segments (finger, hand, and forearm) and joints (metacarpophalangeal and wrist joints) for three phases of pre-stimulation (Pre), during-stimulation (On), and 5 minute post-stimulation (P5). Three characteristic variables of root-mean-squared angular velocity, peak power, and peak power frequency were derived from the vector sum of the sensor signals. At On phase, RMS velocity was reduced from Pre in all segments and joints while peak power was reduced from Pre in all segments and joints except for forearm segment. Sensory stimulation showed no effect on peak power frequency. All variables at P5 were similar to those at On at all segments and joints. The decrease of peak power of the index finger was noted by 90{\%} during stimulation from that of On phase, which was maintained even after 5 min. The results indicate that sensory stimulation may be an effective clinical method to treat the essential tremor.",
keywords = "arms stretched forward, Essential tremor, gyro sensor, postural tremor, sensory stimulation",
author = "Heo, {Jae Hoon} and Kim, {Ji Won} and Yuri Kwon and Lee, {Sang Ki} and Eom, {Gwang Moon} and Do-Young Kwon and Lee, {Chan Nyeong} and Park, {Kun Woo} and Mario Manto",
year = "2015",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.3233/BME-151372",
language = "English",
volume = "26",
pages = "S803--S809",
journal = "Bio-Medical Materials and Engineering",
issn = "0959-2989",
publisher = "IOS Press",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Sensory electrical stimulation for suppression of postural tremor in patients with essential tremor

AU - Heo, Jae Hoon

AU - Kim, Ji Won

AU - Kwon, Yuri

AU - Lee, Sang Ki

AU - Eom, Gwang Moon

AU - Kwon, Do-Young

AU - Lee, Chan Nyeong

AU - Park, Kun Woo

AU - Manto, Mario

PY - 2015/1/1

Y1 - 2015/1/1

N2 - Essential tremor is an involuntary trembling of body limbs in people without tremor-related disease. In previous study, suppression of tremor by sensory electrical stimulation was confirmed on the index finger. This study investigates the effect of sensory stimulation on multiple segments and joints of the upper limb. It denotes the observation regarding the effect's continuity after halting the stimulation. 18 patients with essential tremor (8 men and 10 women) participated in this study. The task, "arms stretched forward", was performed and sensory electrical stimulation was applied on four muscles of the upper limb (Flexor Carpi Radialis, Extensor Carpi Radialis, Biceps Brachii, and Triceps Brachii) for 15 seconds. Three 3-D gyro sensors were used to measure the angular velocities of segments (finger, hand, and forearm) and joints (metacarpophalangeal and wrist joints) for three phases of pre-stimulation (Pre), during-stimulation (On), and 5 minute post-stimulation (P5). Three characteristic variables of root-mean-squared angular velocity, peak power, and peak power frequency were derived from the vector sum of the sensor signals. At On phase, RMS velocity was reduced from Pre in all segments and joints while peak power was reduced from Pre in all segments and joints except for forearm segment. Sensory stimulation showed no effect on peak power frequency. All variables at P5 were similar to those at On at all segments and joints. The decrease of peak power of the index finger was noted by 90% during stimulation from that of On phase, which was maintained even after 5 min. The results indicate that sensory stimulation may be an effective clinical method to treat the essential tremor.

AB - Essential tremor is an involuntary trembling of body limbs in people without tremor-related disease. In previous study, suppression of tremor by sensory electrical stimulation was confirmed on the index finger. This study investigates the effect of sensory stimulation on multiple segments and joints of the upper limb. It denotes the observation regarding the effect's continuity after halting the stimulation. 18 patients with essential tremor (8 men and 10 women) participated in this study. The task, "arms stretched forward", was performed and sensory electrical stimulation was applied on four muscles of the upper limb (Flexor Carpi Radialis, Extensor Carpi Radialis, Biceps Brachii, and Triceps Brachii) for 15 seconds. Three 3-D gyro sensors were used to measure the angular velocities of segments (finger, hand, and forearm) and joints (metacarpophalangeal and wrist joints) for three phases of pre-stimulation (Pre), during-stimulation (On), and 5 minute post-stimulation (P5). Three characteristic variables of root-mean-squared angular velocity, peak power, and peak power frequency were derived from the vector sum of the sensor signals. At On phase, RMS velocity was reduced from Pre in all segments and joints while peak power was reduced from Pre in all segments and joints except for forearm segment. Sensory stimulation showed no effect on peak power frequency. All variables at P5 were similar to those at On at all segments and joints. The decrease of peak power of the index finger was noted by 90% during stimulation from that of On phase, which was maintained even after 5 min. The results indicate that sensory stimulation may be an effective clinical method to treat the essential tremor.

KW - arms stretched forward

KW - Essential tremor

KW - gyro sensor

KW - postural tremor

KW - sensory stimulation

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84978870358&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84978870358&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.3233/BME-151372

DO - 10.3233/BME-151372

M3 - Article

VL - 26

SP - S803-S809

JO - Bio-Medical Materials and Engineering

JF - Bio-Medical Materials and Engineering

SN - 0959-2989

ER -