Sensory TRP channel interactions with endogenous lipids and their biological outcomes

Sungjae Yoo, Ji Yeon Lim, Sun Wook Hwang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Lipids have long been studied as constituents of the cellular architecture and energy stores in the body. Evidence is now rapidly growing that particular lipid species are also important for molecular and cellular signaling. Here we review the current information on interactions between lipids and transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels in nociceptive sensory afferents that mediate pain signaling. Sensory neuronal TRP channels play a crucial role in the detection of a variety of external and internal changes, particularly with damaging or pain-eliciting potentials that include noxiously high or low temperatures, stretching, and harmful substances. In addition, recent findings suggest that TRPs also contribute to altering synaptic plasticity that deteriorates chronic pain states. In both of these processes, specific lipids are often generated and have been found to strongly modulate TRP activities, resulting primarily in pain exacerbation. This review summarizes three standpoints viewing those lipid functions for TRP modulations as second messengers, intercellular transmitters, or bilayer building blocks. Based on these hypotheses, we discuss perspectives that account for how the TRP-lipid interaction contributes to the peripheral pain mechanism. Still a number of blurred aspects remain to be examined, which will be answered by future efforts and may help to better control pain states.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)4708-4744
Number of pages37
JournalMolecules
Volume19
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014 Jan 1

Fingerprint

Transient Receptor Potential Channels
pain
Sensory Receptor Cells
lipids
Lipids
Pain
interactions
Cell signaling
Neuronal Plasticity
Second Messenger Systems
Ion Channels
plastic properties
Chronic Pain
transmitters
Stretching
Plasticity
Transmitters
Modulation
modulation
Temperature

Keywords

  • C-fibers
  • Inflammation
  • Lipids
  • Pain
  • Sensory TRP ion channels

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Organic Chemistry

Cite this

Sensory TRP channel interactions with endogenous lipids and their biological outcomes. / Yoo, Sungjae; Lim, Ji Yeon; Hwang, Sun Wook.

In: Molecules, Vol. 19, No. 4, 01.01.2014, p. 4708-4744.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Yoo, Sungjae ; Lim, Ji Yeon ; Hwang, Sun Wook. / Sensory TRP channel interactions with endogenous lipids and their biological outcomes. In: Molecules. 2014 ; Vol. 19, No. 4. pp. 4708-4744.
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