Serum n-6 fatty acids and lipoprotein subclasses in middle-aged men: The population-based cross-sectional ERA-JUMP study

Jina Choo, Hirotsugu Ueshima, J. David Curb, Chol Shin, Rhobert W. Evans, Aiman El-Saed, Takashi Kadowaki, Tomonori Okamura, Katsumi Nakata, Teruo Otake, Katsuyuki Miura, Robert D. Abbott, Kim Sutton-Tyrrell, Daniel Edmundowicz, Lewis H. Kuller, Akira Sekikawa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Background: The associations of serum omega-6 (n-6) fatty acids with lipoprotein subclasses at the population level are uncertain. Objective: We aimed to examine associations between major n-6 fatty acids [ie, linoleic acid (LA, 18:2n-6) and arachidonic acid (AA, 20:4n-6)] and the lipoprotein subclasses VLDL, LDL, and HDL. Design: We conducted a cross-sectional study in 1098 participants using population-based data from US white, Japanese American, Japanese, and Korean men aged 40-49 y. Serum fatty acids were analyzed by capillary gas-liquid chromatography. Lipoprotein subclasses were measured by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Multiple linear regression models as a function of each fatty acid were used after adjustment for age, population, body mass index, pack-years of smoking, alcohol consumption, diabetes, hypertension, and omega-3 (n-3) and trans fatty acids. Results: Serum LA was inversely associated with large VLDL (β = -0.62, P < 0.001), total LDL (β = -22.08, P < 0.001), and small LDL (β = -31.89, P < 0.001) particle concentrations and VLDL size (β = -0.72, P < 0.001). Serum LA was positively associated with large HDL particle concentration (β = 0.21, P < 0.001) and HDL size (β = 0.03, P < 0.001). The patterns of association of AA with large VLDL and large HDL particle concentrations were comparable with those of LA. Conclusions: At the population level, higher serum concentrations of LA were significantly associated with lower concentrations of total LDL particles. Higher serum concentrations of LA and AA were significantly associated with a lower concentration of large VLDL particles and a higher concentration of large HDL particles. These associations were consistent across the population groups. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00069797.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1195-1203
Number of pages9
JournalAmerican Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Volume91
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010 May 1

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Lipoproteins
Fatty Acids
Serum
Population
Linear Models
Trans Fatty Acids
Asian Americans
VLDL Lipoproteins
Linoleic Acid
Population Groups
Arachidonic Acid
Alcohol Drinking
Gas Chromatography
Body Mass Index
Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy
Cross-Sectional Studies
Smoking
Hypertension
oxidized low density lipoprotein

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

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Serum n-6 fatty acids and lipoprotein subclasses in middle-aged men : The population-based cross-sectional ERA-JUMP study. / Choo, Jina; Ueshima, Hirotsugu; Curb, J. David; Shin, Chol; Evans, Rhobert W.; El-Saed, Aiman; Kadowaki, Takashi; Okamura, Tomonori; Nakata, Katsumi; Otake, Teruo; Miura, Katsuyuki; Abbott, Robert D.; Sutton-Tyrrell, Kim; Edmundowicz, Daniel; Kuller, Lewis H.; Sekikawa, Akira.

In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Vol. 91, No. 5, 01.05.2010, p. 1195-1203.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Choo, J, Ueshima, H, Curb, JD, Shin, C, Evans, RW, El-Saed, A, Kadowaki, T, Okamura, T, Nakata, K, Otake, T, Miura, K, Abbott, RD, Sutton-Tyrrell, K, Edmundowicz, D, Kuller, LH & Sekikawa, A 2010, 'Serum n-6 fatty acids and lipoprotein subclasses in middle-aged men: The population-based cross-sectional ERA-JUMP study', American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 91, no. 5, pp. 1195-1203. https://doi.org/10.3945/ajcn.2009.28500
Choo, Jina ; Ueshima, Hirotsugu ; Curb, J. David ; Shin, Chol ; Evans, Rhobert W. ; El-Saed, Aiman ; Kadowaki, Takashi ; Okamura, Tomonori ; Nakata, Katsumi ; Otake, Teruo ; Miura, Katsuyuki ; Abbott, Robert D. ; Sutton-Tyrrell, Kim ; Edmundowicz, Daniel ; Kuller, Lewis H. ; Sekikawa, Akira. / Serum n-6 fatty acids and lipoprotein subclasses in middle-aged men : The population-based cross-sectional ERA-JUMP study. In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 2010 ; Vol. 91, No. 5. pp. 1195-1203.
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AU - Choo, Jina

AU - Ueshima, Hirotsugu

AU - Curb, J. David

AU - Shin, Chol

AU - Evans, Rhobert W.

AU - El-Saed, Aiman

AU - Kadowaki, Takashi

AU - Okamura, Tomonori

AU - Nakata, Katsumi

AU - Otake, Teruo

AU - Miura, Katsuyuki

AU - Abbott, Robert D.

AU - Sutton-Tyrrell, Kim

AU - Edmundowicz, Daniel

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AU - Sekikawa, Akira

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N2 - Background: The associations of serum omega-6 (n-6) fatty acids with lipoprotein subclasses at the population level are uncertain. Objective: We aimed to examine associations between major n-6 fatty acids [ie, linoleic acid (LA, 18:2n-6) and arachidonic acid (AA, 20:4n-6)] and the lipoprotein subclasses VLDL, LDL, and HDL. Design: We conducted a cross-sectional study in 1098 participants using population-based data from US white, Japanese American, Japanese, and Korean men aged 40-49 y. Serum fatty acids were analyzed by capillary gas-liquid chromatography. Lipoprotein subclasses were measured by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Multiple linear regression models as a function of each fatty acid were used after adjustment for age, population, body mass index, pack-years of smoking, alcohol consumption, diabetes, hypertension, and omega-3 (n-3) and trans fatty acids. Results: Serum LA was inversely associated with large VLDL (β = -0.62, P < 0.001), total LDL (β = -22.08, P < 0.001), and small LDL (β = -31.89, P < 0.001) particle concentrations and VLDL size (β = -0.72, P < 0.001). Serum LA was positively associated with large HDL particle concentration (β = 0.21, P < 0.001) and HDL size (β = 0.03, P < 0.001). The patterns of association of AA with large VLDL and large HDL particle concentrations were comparable with those of LA. Conclusions: At the population level, higher serum concentrations of LA were significantly associated with lower concentrations of total LDL particles. Higher serum concentrations of LA and AA were significantly associated with a lower concentration of large VLDL particles and a higher concentration of large HDL particles. These associations were consistent across the population groups. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00069797.

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