Sex-dependent association between angiotensin-converting enzyme insertion/deletion polymorphism and obesity in relation to sodium intake in children

Soo Jin Yang, Sunyoung Kim, Hyesoon Park, Seon Mee Kim, Kyung Mook Choi, Yunsook Lim, Myoungsook Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Obesity is a complex condition that is influenced by genetic and environmental factors and is associated with an increased risk for diabetes, hypertension, and cardiovascular diseases. Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) is well characterized in the control of blood pressure. This study investigated whether the ACE insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism affects obesity in relation to sodium intake in children. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted in 1260 elementary schoolchildren (633 boys and 627 girls). Subjects were assessed for the degree of obesity, sodium intake, and ACE I/D genotype, and associations were evaluated between the ACE I/D polymorphism and obesity in relation to sodium intake. Results: Sodium intake was significantly correlated with the obesity index (r = 0.048, P = 0.016) and was particularly high in obese D-carrier boys compared with normal D-carrier boys. D-carrier boys did not show any association with the degree of obesity, whereas D-carrier girls with a high sodium intake exhibited a significant association (odds ratio 0.551, P = 0.042) and a negative correlation between the D allele and obesity as a continuous variable (regression coefficient -3.095, P = 0.020), showing gender-dependent associations between the ACE I/D polymorphism and obesity in relation to sodium intake. Conclusions: These findings demonstrate that the association between the ACE I/D polymorphism and obesity in relation to sodium intake is gender dependent in children.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)525-530
Number of pages6
JournalNutrition
Volume29
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013 Mar 1

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Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A
Obesity
Sodium
Cardiovascular Diseases
Cross-Sectional Studies
Alleles
Odds Ratio
Genotype
Blood Pressure
Hypertension

Keywords

  • Adiposity
  • Angiotensin-converting enzyme insertion/deletion polymorphism
  • Gender-dependent association
  • Obesity
  • Sodium intake

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

Sex-dependent association between angiotensin-converting enzyme insertion/deletion polymorphism and obesity in relation to sodium intake in children. / Yang, Soo Jin; Kim, Sunyoung; Park, Hyesoon; Kim, Seon Mee; Choi, Kyung Mook; Lim, Yunsook; Lee, Myoungsook.

In: Nutrition, Vol. 29, No. 3, 01.03.2013, p. 525-530.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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