Significant inverse association of marine n-3 fatty acids with plasma fibrinogen levels in Japanese in Japan but not in whites or Japanese Americans

L. J. Hassen, H. Ueshima, J. D. Curb, Jina Choo, S. Lee, K. Masaki, T. Kadowaki, Chol Shin, R. W. Evans, T. B. Seto, A. Fujiyoshi, B. J. Willcox, K. Sutton-Tyrrell, A. Kadota, A. El-Saed, K. Miura, L. H. Kuller, A. Sekikawa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background/Objectives: Numerous studies reported beneficial effects of marine n-3 fatty acids (n-3 FAs) on cardiovascular disease (CVD) and its risk factors. However, the association of marine n-3 FAs with plasma fibrinogen, a risk factor for CVD, remains uncertain. Subjects/Methods: In a population-based, cross-sectional study of 795 men aged 40-49 without CVD (262 whites in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, USA, 302 Japanese in Kusatsu, Japan and 229 Japanese Americans in Honolulu, Hawaii, USA), we examined the association of marine n-3 FAs with plasma fibrinogen. Serum FAs were measured by capillary gas-liquid chromatography. Marine n-3 FAs were defined as the sum of docosahexaenoic, eicosapentaenoic and docosapentaenoic acids. Plasma fibrinogen was measured by an automated clot-rate assay. Multiple linear regression analyses were performed to assess the association. Results: White, Japanese and Japanese-American men had mean marine n-3 FAs levels of 3.47%, 8.78% and 4.46%, respectively. Japanese men had a significant inverse association of marine n-3 FAs with fibrinogen (standardized regression coefficient of -0.11, P=0.049), after adjusting for age, body-mass index and current smoking. The significant inverse association remained after further adjusting for diabetes, C-reactive protein, triglycerides and other variables. White or Japanese-American men did not show a significant association. Conclusions: We observed the significant inverse association of marine n-3 FAs with fibrinogen in Japanese, but not in whites or Japanese Americans. The observation suggests that marine n-3 FAs at very high levels, as seen in the Japanese, may decrease plasma fibrinogen levels.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)329-335
Number of pages7
JournalEuropean Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Volume66
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012 Mar 1

Keywords

  • epidemiology
  • fibrinogen
  • Japanese
  • marine n-3 fatty acids

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

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    Hassen, L. J., Ueshima, H., Curb, J. D., Choo, J., Lee, S., Masaki, K., Kadowaki, T., Shin, C., Evans, R. W., Seto, T. B., Fujiyoshi, A., Willcox, B. J., Sutton-Tyrrell, K., Kadota, A., El-Saed, A., Miura, K., Kuller, L. H., & Sekikawa, A. (2012). Significant inverse association of marine n-3 fatty acids with plasma fibrinogen levels in Japanese in Japan but not in whites or Japanese Americans. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 66(3), 329-335. https://doi.org/10.1038/ejcn.2011.155