Simple overlay device for determining radial head and neck height

Jungyu Moon, Richard D. Southgate, James S. Fitzsimmons, Shawn W. O'Driscoll

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that a simple overlay device can be used on radiographs to measure radial head and neck height. Materials and methods: Thirty anteroposterior elbow radiographs from 30 patients with a clinical diagnosis of lateral epicondylitis were examined to measure radial head and neck height. Three methods using different points along the bicipital tuberosity as a landmark were used. Method 1 used the proximal end of the bicipital tuberosity, method 2 used the most prominent point of the bicipital tuberosity, and method 3 used a simple overlay device (SOD) template that was aligned with anatomic reference points. All measurements were performed three times by three observers to determine interobserver and intraobserver reliability. Results: Intraclass correlation coefficients revealed higher interobserver and intraobserver correlations for the SOD template method than for the other two methods. The 95% limits of agreement between observers were markedly better (-1.8 mm to +1.0 mm) for the SOD template method than for the proximal point method (-3.8 mm to +3.4 mm) or the prominent point method (-5.9 mm to +4.9 mm). Conclusions: We found that the SOD template method was reliable for assessing radial head and neck height. It had less variability than other methods, its 95% limit of agreement being less than 2 mm. This method could be helpful for assessing whether or not the insertion of a radial head prosthesis has resulted in over-lengthening of the radius.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)915-920
Number of pages6
JournalSkeletal Radiology
Volume39
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010 Sep 1
Externally publishedYes

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Neck
Equipment and Supplies
Tennis Elbow
Elbow
Prostheses and Implants

Keywords

  • Anatomy
  • Bicipital tuberosity
  • Biomechanics
  • Overstuffing
  • Prosthesis
  • Radial head
  • Radiographs
  • Template

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Cite this

Moon, J., Southgate, R. D., Fitzsimmons, J. S., & O'Driscoll, S. W. (2010). Simple overlay device for determining radial head and neck height. Skeletal Radiology, 39(9), 915-920. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00256-010-0893-5

Simple overlay device for determining radial head and neck height. / Moon, Jungyu; Southgate, Richard D.; Fitzsimmons, James S.; O'Driscoll, Shawn W.

In: Skeletal Radiology, Vol. 39, No. 9, 01.09.2010, p. 915-920.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Moon, J, Southgate, RD, Fitzsimmons, JS & O'Driscoll, SW 2010, 'Simple overlay device for determining radial head and neck height', Skeletal Radiology, vol. 39, no. 9, pp. 915-920. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00256-010-0893-5
Moon, Jungyu ; Southgate, Richard D. ; Fitzsimmons, James S. ; O'Driscoll, Shawn W. / Simple overlay device for determining radial head and neck height. In: Skeletal Radiology. 2010 ; Vol. 39, No. 9. pp. 915-920.
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