Single-incision multiport laparoscopic cholecystectomy

Things to overcome

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: To report on our initial experience with single-incision multiport laparoscopic cholecystectomy, together with its clinical outcomes. Design: Nonrandomized prospective study. Setting: University department of surgery. Patients: Sixty-four patients with gallstones and gall-bladder polyps were enrolled after providing informed consent. Based on our experience, we excluded patients with acute cholecystitis, concomitant choledocholithiasis, a history of previous upper abdominal surgery, and a suspicion of gallbladder cancer. Main Outcome Measures: We analyzed the outcomes and complications, based on our experience, according to the clinicopathologic and operative factors. We also compared patients who underwent singleincision multiport laparoscopic cholecystectomy with those who were converted to conventional laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Results: There were 2 bile duct injuries and 4 surgical site infections.Wehad difficulties in visualizing the Calot triangle in 22 patients. Higher levels of inflammatory markers, longer operation times, and more frequent bile juice spillage were significantly observed in those patients. Ten patients were converted to conventional laparoscopic cholecystectomy. The mean age of patients who underwent conversion surgery was significantly older than that of the no-conversion group. The more the body mass index increased, the more the conversion rate increased. Conclusions: Experienced laparoscopic surgeons can safely perform cholecystectomy using conventional and curved laparoscopic instruments in selected patients. We recommend that you consider performing conventional laparoscopic cholecystectomy or that you use additional retraction devices for patients with a higher body mass index or acute cholecystitis.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)68-73
Number of pages6
JournalArchives of Surgery
Volume146
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011 Jan 1

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Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy
Acute Cholecystitis
Body Mass Index
Gallbladder Neoplasms
Choledocholithiasis
Surgical Wound Infection
Cholecystectomy
Gallstones
Polyps
Bile Ducts
Informed Consent
Bile
Urinary Bladder
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Prospective Studies
Equipment and Supplies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Single-incision multiport laparoscopic cholecystectomy : Things to overcome. / Han, Hyung Joon; Choi, Sae-Byeol; Kim, Wan-Bae; Choi, Sang Yong.

In: Archives of Surgery, Vol. 146, No. 1, 01.01.2011, p. 68-73.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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