Slip distance as an objective criterion to determine the dominant parameter between static and dynamic COFs

Rohae Myung, James L. Smith, Tom B. Leamon

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Dynamic friction seems to be more appropriate as a measure of floor slipperiness. However, static friction has been more commonly used and has been a good measure for non-slippery conditions. Therefore, an experiment was conducted to find the dominant COF (static or dynamic) in non-slippery floors and correlating slip distance with each COF. As a result, slip distance was found to be a good measure to represent floor slipperiness because it was exponentially related with static and dynamic COFs. In conclusion, static COF can be a good parameter in non-slippery conditions for prevention of slips and falls.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the Human Factors Society
PublisherPubl by Human Factors Soc Inc
Pages738-741
Number of pages4
Volume1
Publication statusPublished - 1992
Externally publishedYes
EventProceedings of the Human Factors Society 36th Annual Meeting. Part 2 (f 2) - Atlanta, GA, USA
Duration: 1992 Oct 121992 Oct 16

Other

OtherProceedings of the Human Factors Society 36th Annual Meeting. Part 2 (f 2)
CityAtlanta, GA, USA
Period92/10/1292/10/16

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Friction
Experiments

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)

Cite this

Myung, R., Smith, J. L., & Leamon, T. B. (1992). Slip distance as an objective criterion to determine the dominant parameter between static and dynamic COFs. In Proceedings of the Human Factors Society (Vol. 1, pp. 738-741). Publ by Human Factors Soc Inc.

Slip distance as an objective criterion to determine the dominant parameter between static and dynamic COFs. / Myung, Rohae; Smith, James L.; Leamon, Tom B.

Proceedings of the Human Factors Society. Vol. 1 Publ by Human Factors Soc Inc, 1992. p. 738-741.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Myung, R, Smith, JL & Leamon, TB 1992, Slip distance as an objective criterion to determine the dominant parameter between static and dynamic COFs. in Proceedings of the Human Factors Society. vol. 1, Publ by Human Factors Soc Inc, pp. 738-741, Proceedings of the Human Factors Society 36th Annual Meeting. Part 2 (f 2), Atlanta, GA, USA, 92/10/12.
Myung R, Smith JL, Leamon TB. Slip distance as an objective criterion to determine the dominant parameter between static and dynamic COFs. In Proceedings of the Human Factors Society. Vol. 1. Publ by Human Factors Soc Inc. 1992. p. 738-741
Myung, Rohae ; Smith, James L. ; Leamon, Tom B. / Slip distance as an objective criterion to determine the dominant parameter between static and dynamic COFs. Proceedings of the Human Factors Society. Vol. 1 Publ by Human Factors Soc Inc, 1992. pp. 738-741
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