Social and Economic Policies Matter for Health Equity: Conclusions of the SOPHIE Project

SOPHIE investigators

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Since 2011, the SOPHIE project has accumulated evidence regarding the influence of social and economic policies on population health levels, as well as on health inequalities according to socioeconomic position, gender, and immigrant status. Through comparative analyses and evaluation case studies across Europe, SOPHIE has shown how these health inequalities vary according to contexts in macroeconomics, social protection, labor market, built environment, housing, gender equity, and immigrant integration and may be reduced by equity-oriented policies in these fields. These studies can help public health and social justice advocates to build a strong case for fairer social and economic policies that will lead to the reduction of health inequalities that most governments have included among their policy goals. In this article, we summarize the main findings and policy implications of the SOPHIE project and the lessons learned on civil society participation in research and results communication.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)417-434
Number of pages18
JournalInternational Journal of Health Services
Volume48
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018 Jul 1
Externally publishedYes

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Public Policy
Economics
Health
Social Justice
Health Status
Public Health
Communication
Research
Population
Health Equity

Keywords

  • health equity
  • realist methods
  • social inequalities in health
  • social policy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Policy

Cite this

Social and Economic Policies Matter for Health Equity : Conclusions of the SOPHIE Project. / SOPHIE investigators.

In: International Journal of Health Services, Vol. 48, No. 3, 01.07.2018, p. 417-434.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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