Clase social, desigualdades en salud y conductas relacionadas con la salud de la población trabajadora en Chile

Translated title of the contribution: Social class, health inequalities, and health-related behaviors of working people in Chile

Kátia Bones Rocha, Carles Muntaner, María José González Rodríguez, Pamela Bernales Baksai, Clelia Vallebuona, Carme Borrell, Orielle Solar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective. To analyze links between social class and health-related indicators and behaviors in Chilean workers, from a neo-Marxian perspective. Methods. A cross-sectional study based on the First National Survey on Employment, Work, Health, and Quality of Life of Workers in Chile, done in 2009-2010 (n = 9 503). Dependent variables were self-perceived health status and mental health, examined using the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12). Health-related behavior variables included tobacco use and physical activity. The independent variable was neo- Marxian social class. Descriptive analyses of prevalence were performed and odds ratio (OR) models and 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) were estimated. Results. Medium employers (between 2 and 10 employees) reported a lower prevalence of poor health (21.6% [OR 0.68; 95%CI 0.46-0.99]). Unskilled managers had the lowest mental health risk (OR 0.43; 95%CI 0.21-0.88), with differences between men and women. Large employers (more than 10 employees) reported smoking the least, while large employers, expert supervisors, and semi-skilled workers engaged in significantly more physical activity. Conclusions. Large employers and expert managers have the best health-related indicators and behaviors. Formal proletarians, informal proletarians, and unskilled supervisors, however, have the worst general health indicators, confirming that social class is a key determinant in the generation of population health inequalities.

Original languageSpanish
Pages (from-to)340-348
Number of pages9
JournalRevista Panamericana de Salud Publica/Pan American Journal of Public Health
Volume33
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013 May 1
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Chile
Social Class
Health
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Mental Health
Exercise
Tobacco Use
Health Status
Cross-Sectional Studies
Smoking
Quality of Life
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Clase social, desigualdades en salud y conductas relacionadas con la salud de la población trabajadora en Chile. / Rocha, Kátia Bones; Muntaner, Carles; González Rodríguez, María José; Baksai, Pamela Bernales; Vallebuona, Clelia; Borrell, Carme; Solar, Orielle.

In: Revista Panamericana de Salud Publica/Pan American Journal of Public Health, Vol. 33, No. 5, 01.05.2013, p. 340-348.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rocha, Kátia Bones ; Muntaner, Carles ; González Rodríguez, María José ; Baksai, Pamela Bernales ; Vallebuona, Clelia ; Borrell, Carme ; Solar, Orielle. / Clase social, desigualdades en salud y conductas relacionadas con la salud de la población trabajadora en Chile. In: Revista Panamericana de Salud Publica/Pan American Journal of Public Health. 2013 ; Vol. 33, No. 5. pp. 340-348.
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