Steady streaming and mass transfer due to capillary waves in a two-layer system

Alexander Yarin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The work deals with stationary (dc) streaming flows resulting from standing capillary waves at the interface between two immiscible liquid layers, and with their effect on the mass transfer rate of a passive scalar (for example, a protein). Planar layers in a narrow channel are considered. Secondary streaming flows in the Stokes layers near the interfaces are calculated, as well as the corresponding vortical flows arising in the bulk. It is shown that the vortices can significantly enhance the mass transfer rate of a passive scalar which is to be extracted by one liquid from the other. The corresponding Sherwood number is of order [u* intλ/D1]1/2, where u* int is the magnitude of the interfacial streaming velocity, λ is the wavelength, and D1 is the diffusion coefficient in liquid 1. This means that the effective diffusion coefficient is of order

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)79-102
Number of pages24
JournalFluid Dynamics Research
Volume31
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2002 Aug 1
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

capillary waves
mass transfer
Mass transfer
Liquids
diffusion coefficient
liquids
scalars
Vortex flow
vortices
proteins
Proteins
Wavelength
wavelengths

Keywords

  • Mass transfer at liquid-liquid interface
  • Standing capillary waves
  • Stationary de streaming
  • Two-layer system

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Mechanical Engineering
  • Statistical and Nonlinear Physics

Cite this

Steady streaming and mass transfer due to capillary waves in a two-layer system. / Yarin, Alexander.

In: Fluid Dynamics Research, Vol. 31, No. 2, 01.08.2002, p. 79-102.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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