Structural and functional dissection of human cytomegalovirus US3 in binding major histocompatibility complex class I molecules

S. Lee, J. Yoon, B. Park, Y. Jun, M. Jin, H. C. Sung, Ik Hwan Kim, Seong Man Kang, Eui Ju Choi, Byung-Yoon Ahn, K. Ahn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

The human cytomegalovirus US3, an endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-resident transmembrane glycoprotein, forms a complex with major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules and retains them in the ER, thereby preventing cytolysis by cytotoxic T lymphocytes. To identify which parts of US3 confine the protein to the ER and which parts are responsible for the association with MHC class I molecules, we constructed truncated mutant and chimeric forms in which US3 domains were exchanged with corresponding domains of CD4 and analyzed them for their intracellular localization and the ability to associate with MHC class I molecules. All of the truncated mutant and chimeric proteins containing the luminal domain of US3 were retained in the ER, while replacement of the US3 luminal domain with that of CD4 led to cell surface expression of the chimera. Thus, the luminal domain of US3 was sufficient for ER retention. Immunolocalization of the US3 glycoprotein after nocodazole treatment and the observation that the carbohydrate moiety of the US3 glycoprotein was not modified by Golgi enzymes indicated that the ER localization of US3 involved true retention, without recycling through the Golgi. Unlike the ER retention signal, the ability to associate with MHC class I molecules required the transmembrane domain in addition to the luminal domain of US3. Direct interaction between US3 and MHC class I molecules could be demonstrated after in vitro translation by coimmunoprecipitation. Together, the present data indicate that the properties that allow US3 to be localized in the ER and bind MHC class I molecules are located in different parts of the molecule.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)11262-11269
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Virology
Volume74
Issue number23
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2000 Dec 1

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Major Histocompatibility Complex
Cytomegalovirus
Endoplasmic Reticulum
Dissection
Glycoproteins
Mutant Chimeric Proteins
Nocodazole
Recycling
Cytotoxic T-Lymphocytes
Carbohydrates
Enzymes
Proteins

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology

Cite this

Structural and functional dissection of human cytomegalovirus US3 in binding major histocompatibility complex class I molecules. / Lee, S.; Yoon, J.; Park, B.; Jun, Y.; Jin, M.; Sung, H. C.; Kim, Ik Hwan; Kang, Seong Man; Choi, Eui Ju; Ahn, Byung-Yoon; Ahn, K.

In: Journal of Virology, Vol. 74, No. 23, 01.12.2000, p. 11262-11269.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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