Suicidal ideation and attempts in patients with stroke

a population-based study

Jae Ho Chung, Jung Bin Kim, Ji Hyun Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Stroke is known to be associated with an increase in the risk for suicide. However, there are very few population-based studies investigating the risk of suicidal ideation and attempts in patients with stroke. The purpose of this study was to compare the risk of suicidal ideation and attempts between patients with stroke and population without stroke using nationwide survey data. Individual-level data were obtained from 228,735 participants (4560 with stroke and 224,175 without stroke) of the 2013 Korean Community Health Survey. Demographic characteristics, socioeconomic status, physical health status, and mental health status were compared between patients with stroke and population without stroke. Multivariable logistic regression was performed to investigate the independent effects of the stroke on suicidal ideation and attempts. Stroke patients had more depressive mood (12.6 %) than population without stroke (5.7 %, p < 0.001). Stroke patients experienced more suicidal ideation (24.4 %) and attempts (1.3 %) than population without stroke (9.8 and 0.4 %, respectively; both p < 0.001). Stroke was found to increase the risk for suicidal ideation (OR 1.65, 95 % CI 1.52–1.79) and suicidal attempts (OR 1.64, 95 % CI 1.21–2.22), adjusting for demographics, socioeconomic factors, and physical health and mental health factors. We found that stroke increased the risk for suicidal ideation and attempts, independent of other factors that are known to be associated with suicidality, suggesting that stroke per se may be an independent risk factor for suicidality.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2032-2038
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Neurology
Volume263
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016 Oct 1

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Suicidal Ideation
Stroke
Population
Health Status
Mental Health
Demography
Health Surveys
Social Class

Keywords

  • Population-based study
  • Stroke
  • Suicidal attempts
  • Suicidal ideation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Suicidal ideation and attempts in patients with stroke : a population-based study. / Chung, Jae Ho; Kim, Jung Bin; Kim, Ji Hyun.

In: Journal of Neurology, Vol. 263, No. 10, 01.10.2016, p. 2032-2038.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Chung, Jae Ho ; Kim, Jung Bin ; Kim, Ji Hyun. / Suicidal ideation and attempts in patients with stroke : a population-based study. In: Journal of Neurology. 2016 ; Vol. 263, No. 10. pp. 2032-2038.
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