Superhard SiC thin films with a microstructure of nanocolumnar crystalline grains and an amorphous intergranular phase

Kwan Won Lim, Yong Sub Sim, Joo Youl Huh, Jong Keuk Park, Wook Seong Lee, Young Joon Baik

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Silicon carbide (SiC) thin films become superhard when they have microstructures of nanocolumnar crystalline grains (NCCG) with an intergranular amorphous SiC matrix. We investigated the role of ion bombardment and deposition temperature in forming the NCCG in SiC thin films. A direct-current (DC) unbalanced magnetron sputtering method was used with pure Ar as sputtering gas to deposit the SiC thin films at fixed target power of 200 W and chamber pressure of 0.4 Pa. The Ar ion bombardment of the deposited films was conducted by applying a negative DC bias voltage 0-100 V to the substrate during deposition. The deposition temperature was varied between room temperature and 450°C. Above a critical bias voltage of -80 V, the NCCG formed, whereas, below it, the SiC films were amorphous. Additionally, a minimum thermal energy (corresponding to a deposition temperature of 450°C in this study) was required for the NCCG formation. Transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and glancing angle X-ray diffraction analysis (GAXRD) were conducted to probe the samples’ structural characteristics. Of those methods, Raman spectroscopy was a particularly efficient non-destructive tool to analyze the formation of the SiC NCCG in the film, whereas GAXRD was insufficiently sensitive.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)206-211
Number of pages6
JournalCorrosion Science and Technology
Volume18
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019 Jan 1

Fingerprint

Silicon carbide
Crystalline materials
Thin films
Microstructure
Ion bombardment
Bias voltage
X ray diffraction analysis
Raman spectroscopy
Temperature
Amorphous films
Thermal energy
Amorphous silicon
Magnetron sputtering
Sputtering
silicon carbide
Deposits
Gases
Transmission electron microscopy
Substrates

Keywords

  • Amorphous matrix phase
  • Hardness
  • Nanocolumnar crystalline grain
  • Nanocomposite structure
  • Silicon carbide

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Materials Chemistry
  • Metals and Alloys
  • Surfaces, Coatings and Films
  • Electrochemistry

Cite this

Superhard SiC thin films with a microstructure of nanocolumnar crystalline grains and an amorphous intergranular phase. / Lim, Kwan Won; Sim, Yong Sub; Huh, Joo Youl; Park, Jong Keuk; Lee, Wook Seong; Baik, Young Joon.

In: Corrosion Science and Technology, Vol. 18, No. 5, 01.01.2019, p. 206-211.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lim, Kwan Won ; Sim, Yong Sub ; Huh, Joo Youl ; Park, Jong Keuk ; Lee, Wook Seong ; Baik, Young Joon. / Superhard SiC thin films with a microstructure of nanocolumnar crystalline grains and an amorphous intergranular phase. In: Corrosion Science and Technology. 2019 ; Vol. 18, No. 5. pp. 206-211.
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