Synergistic induction of 1,25,-dihydroxyvitamin D3-and all-trans-retinoic acid-induced differentiation of HL-60 leukemia cells by yomogin, a sesquiterpene lactone from Artemisia princeps

Seung Hyun Kim, Tae Sung Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Many anti-inflammatory agents are known to significantly enhance the terminal differentiation of some cancer cells such as leukemia cells. In this study, the effect of yomogin, a eudesmane sesquiterpene lactone isolated from Artemisia princeps with antiinflammatory activity, was investigated in human promyelocytic leukemia HL-60 cells. Yomogin by itself induced small increases in cell differentiation, with less than 19% of the cells attaining a differentiated phenotype. Importantly, yomogin synergistically enhanced differentiation of HL-60 cells in a dose-dependent manner when combined with either 5 nM 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 [1,25-(OH)2D3] or 50 nM all-trans retinoic acid (all-trans RA). Cytofluorometric analysis and morphologic studies indicated that the combinations of yomogin and 1,25-(OH)2D3 stimulated differentiation to monocytes whereas the combinations of yomogin and all-trans RA stimulated differentiation to granulocytes. These results suggest that yomogin may be useful in combination with 1,25-(OH)2D3 or all-trans-RA in the differentiation therapy for myeloid leukemias.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)886-890
Number of pages5
JournalPlanta Medica
Volume68
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2002 Oct 1

Keywords

  • 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D
  • All-trans-retinoic acid
  • Cancer
  • Differentiation
  • Yomogin

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Analytical Chemistry
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Pharmacology
  • Pharmaceutical Science
  • Drug Discovery
  • Complementary and alternative medicine
  • Organic Chemistry

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Synergistic induction of 1,25,-dihydroxyvitamin D<sub>3</sub>-and all-trans-retinoic acid-induced differentiation of HL-60 leukemia cells by yomogin, a sesquiterpene lactone from Artemisia princeps'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this