Tagging cities? Reading RFID tags from inside brick and mortar

Yongtae Park, Hyogon Kim

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

RFID has been traditionally used for tagging moving objects. In this poster, we explore using it to tag and annotate fixed struc- tures like buildings and even city infrastructures. Based on the as- sumption that in order to avoid tampering and vandalism, the RFID tags could be implanted in building materials, we perform the read- ing performance measurement with RFID tags buried in concrete bricks. We find that the reading distance is decimated to a few cen- timeters, both in the completely buried case and the exposed case. The implication is that the intended application is immediately pos- sible for mobile robots that can place the RFID reader a few cen- timeters above the floor while navigating. But for human users, the reading distance should be much longer. In future, we will inves- tigate how we can extend the reading range of the passive RFID tags even when they are attached to or embedded in the building materials.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationSenSys 2012 - Proceedings of the 10th ACM Conference on Embedded Networked Sensor Systems
Pages331-332
Number of pages2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012 Dec 1
Event10th ACM Conference on Embedded Networked Sensor Systems, SenSys 2012 - Toronto, ON, Canada
Duration: 2012 Nov 62012 Nov 9

Other

Other10th ACM Conference on Embedded Networked Sensor Systems, SenSys 2012
CountryCanada
CityToronto, ON
Period12/11/612/11/9

Fingerprint

Brick
Mortar
Radio frequency identification (RFID)
Mobile robots
Concretes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Networks and Communications

Cite this

Park, Y., & Kim, H. (2012). Tagging cities? Reading RFID tags from inside brick and mortar. In SenSys 2012 - Proceedings of the 10th ACM Conference on Embedded Networked Sensor Systems (pp. 331-332) https://doi.org/10.1145/2426656.2426693

Tagging cities? Reading RFID tags from inside brick and mortar. / Park, Yongtae; Kim, Hyogon.

SenSys 2012 - Proceedings of the 10th ACM Conference on Embedded Networked Sensor Systems. 2012. p. 331-332.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Park, Y & Kim, H 2012, Tagging cities? Reading RFID tags from inside brick and mortar. in SenSys 2012 - Proceedings of the 10th ACM Conference on Embedded Networked Sensor Systems. pp. 331-332, 10th ACM Conference on Embedded Networked Sensor Systems, SenSys 2012, Toronto, ON, Canada, 12/11/6. https://doi.org/10.1145/2426656.2426693
Park Y, Kim H. Tagging cities? Reading RFID tags from inside brick and mortar. In SenSys 2012 - Proceedings of the 10th ACM Conference on Embedded Networked Sensor Systems. 2012. p. 331-332 https://doi.org/10.1145/2426656.2426693
Park, Yongtae ; Kim, Hyogon. / Tagging cities? Reading RFID tags from inside brick and mortar. SenSys 2012 - Proceedings of the 10th ACM Conference on Embedded Networked Sensor Systems. 2012. pp. 331-332
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