The antimicrobial activity of (-)-epigallocatehin-3-gallate and green tea extracts against Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli isolated from skin wounds

Jiehyun Jeon, Joo Ha Kim, Chang Kyu Lee, Chil Hwan Oh, Hae Jun Song

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Skin infections with Gram-negative bacteria are sometimes challenging to treat, because these bacteria show multidrug resistance against commonly used antibiotics and patients with Gram-negative bacterial infection overall have deteriorated in conditions in many cases. Studies have shown that epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) and green tea extracts (GTE) inhibit the growth of several Gram-positive bacteria species. Objective: The purpose of this study was to investigate the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of EGCG and GTE in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli, and assess the use of these chemicals as an alternative or adjunct topical antimicrobial agent against P. aeruginosa and E. coli with multidrug resistance. Methods: The MICs of EGCG, GTE, and other tested antibiotics were measured and compared to determine the antibacterial efficacy and the differences in pattern of resistance. Results: The P. aeruginosa and E. coli strains used in this study showed multidrug resistance. EGCG inhibited the growth of P. aeruginosa at a MIC level of 200-400 μg/ml. The MIC of GTE was a 1:16 dilution for P. aeruginosa. EGCG showed antimicrobial activity against E. coli at a MIC of 400 μg/ml. In the case of GTE, the MIC was a dilution between 1:8 and 1:4 for E. coli. Conclusion: EGCG and GTE showed potential as alternative or adjunct topical antimicrobial agents for infections that are resistant to traditional antibiotic therapy.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)564-569
Number of pages6
JournalAnnals of Dermatology
Volume26
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014 Jan 1

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Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Tea
Pseudomonas aeruginosa
Escherichia coli
Skin
Wounds and Injuries
Multiple Drug Resistance
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Anti-Infective Agents
Gram-Negative Bacterial Infections
Gram-Positive Bacteria
Growth
Infection
Gram-Negative Bacteria
epigallocatechin gallate
Bacteria

Keywords

  • Epigallocatechin gallate
  • Escherichia coli
  • Gram-negative bacterial infection
  • Microbial sensitivity tests
  • Pseudomonas aeruginosa

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dermatology

Cite this

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title = "The antimicrobial activity of (-)-epigallocatehin-3-gallate and green tea extracts against Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli isolated from skin wounds",
abstract = "Background: Skin infections with Gram-negative bacteria are sometimes challenging to treat, because these bacteria show multidrug resistance against commonly used antibiotics and patients with Gram-negative bacterial infection overall have deteriorated in conditions in many cases. Studies have shown that epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) and green tea extracts (GTE) inhibit the growth of several Gram-positive bacteria species. Objective: The purpose of this study was to investigate the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of EGCG and GTE in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli, and assess the use of these chemicals as an alternative or adjunct topical antimicrobial agent against P. aeruginosa and E. coli with multidrug resistance. Methods: The MICs of EGCG, GTE, and other tested antibiotics were measured and compared to determine the antibacterial efficacy and the differences in pattern of resistance. Results: The P. aeruginosa and E. coli strains used in this study showed multidrug resistance. EGCG inhibited the growth of P. aeruginosa at a MIC level of 200-400 μg/ml. The MIC of GTE was a 1:16 dilution for P. aeruginosa. EGCG showed antimicrobial activity against E. coli at a MIC of 400 μg/ml. In the case of GTE, the MIC was a dilution between 1:8 and 1:4 for E. coli. Conclusion: EGCG and GTE showed potential as alternative or adjunct topical antimicrobial agents for infections that are resistant to traditional antibiotic therapy.",
keywords = "Epigallocatechin gallate, Escherichia coli, Gram-negative bacterial infection, Microbial sensitivity tests, Pseudomonas aeruginosa",
author = "Jiehyun Jeon and Kim, {Joo Ha} and Lee, {Chang Kyu} and Oh, {Chil Hwan} and Song, {Hae Jun}",
year = "2014",
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T1 - The antimicrobial activity of (-)-epigallocatehin-3-gallate and green tea extracts against Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli isolated from skin wounds

AU - Jeon, Jiehyun

AU - Kim, Joo Ha

AU - Lee, Chang Kyu

AU - Oh, Chil Hwan

AU - Song, Hae Jun

PY - 2014/1/1

Y1 - 2014/1/1

N2 - Background: Skin infections with Gram-negative bacteria are sometimes challenging to treat, because these bacteria show multidrug resistance against commonly used antibiotics and patients with Gram-negative bacterial infection overall have deteriorated in conditions in many cases. Studies have shown that epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) and green tea extracts (GTE) inhibit the growth of several Gram-positive bacteria species. Objective: The purpose of this study was to investigate the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of EGCG and GTE in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli, and assess the use of these chemicals as an alternative or adjunct topical antimicrobial agent against P. aeruginosa and E. coli with multidrug resistance. Methods: The MICs of EGCG, GTE, and other tested antibiotics were measured and compared to determine the antibacterial efficacy and the differences in pattern of resistance. Results: The P. aeruginosa and E. coli strains used in this study showed multidrug resistance. EGCG inhibited the growth of P. aeruginosa at a MIC level of 200-400 μg/ml. The MIC of GTE was a 1:16 dilution for P. aeruginosa. EGCG showed antimicrobial activity against E. coli at a MIC of 400 μg/ml. In the case of GTE, the MIC was a dilution between 1:8 and 1:4 for E. coli. Conclusion: EGCG and GTE showed potential as alternative or adjunct topical antimicrobial agents for infections that are resistant to traditional antibiotic therapy.

AB - Background: Skin infections with Gram-negative bacteria are sometimes challenging to treat, because these bacteria show multidrug resistance against commonly used antibiotics and patients with Gram-negative bacterial infection overall have deteriorated in conditions in many cases. Studies have shown that epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) and green tea extracts (GTE) inhibit the growth of several Gram-positive bacteria species. Objective: The purpose of this study was to investigate the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of EGCG and GTE in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli, and assess the use of these chemicals as an alternative or adjunct topical antimicrobial agent against P. aeruginosa and E. coli with multidrug resistance. Methods: The MICs of EGCG, GTE, and other tested antibiotics were measured and compared to determine the antibacterial efficacy and the differences in pattern of resistance. Results: The P. aeruginosa and E. coli strains used in this study showed multidrug resistance. EGCG inhibited the growth of P. aeruginosa at a MIC level of 200-400 μg/ml. The MIC of GTE was a 1:16 dilution for P. aeruginosa. EGCG showed antimicrobial activity against E. coli at a MIC of 400 μg/ml. In the case of GTE, the MIC was a dilution between 1:8 and 1:4 for E. coli. Conclusion: EGCG and GTE showed potential as alternative or adjunct topical antimicrobial agents for infections that are resistant to traditional antibiotic therapy.

KW - Epigallocatechin gallate

KW - Escherichia coli

KW - Gram-negative bacterial infection

KW - Microbial sensitivity tests

KW - Pseudomonas aeruginosa

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