The Berlin Brain-Computer Interface (BBCI) - Towards a new communication channel for online control in gaming applications

Roman Krepki, Benjamin Blankertz, Gabriel Curio, Klaus Muller

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

105 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The investigation of innovative Human-Computer Interfaces (HCI) provides a challenge for future multimedia research and development. Brain-Computer Interfaces (BCI) exploit the ability of human communication and control bypassing the classical neuromuscular communication channels. In general, BCIs offer a possibility of communication for people with severe neuromuscular disorders, such as Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) or spinal cord injury. Beyond medical applications, a BCI conjunction with exciting multimedia applications, e.g., a dexterity game, could define a new level of control possibilities also for healthy customers decoding information directly from the user's brain, as reflected in electroencephalographic (EEG) signals which are recorded non-invasively from user's scalp. This contribution introduces the Berlin Brain-Computer Interface (BBCI) and presents setups where the user is provided with intuitive control strategies in plausible gaming applications that use biofeedback. Yet at its beginning, BBCI thus adds a new dimension in multimedia research by offering the user an additional and independent communication channel based on brain activity only. First successful experiments already yielded inspiring proofs-of-concept. A diversity of multimedia application models, say computer games, and their specific intuitive control strategies, as well as various Virtual Reality (VR) scenarios are now open for BCI research aiming at a further speed up of user adaptation and increase of learning success and transfer bit rates.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)73-90
Number of pages18
JournalMultimedia Tools and Applications
Volume33
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2007 Apr 1
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

On-line Control
Brain computer interface
Gaming
Communication Channels
Brain
Multimedia Applications
Biofeedback
Multimedia
Control Strategy
Computer games
Intuitive
Communication
Medical applications
Virtual reality
Human-computer Interface
Interfaces (computer)
Decoding
Computer Games
Medical Applications
Virtual Reality

Keywords

  • Biofeedback
  • Brain-computer interface
  • Brain-gaming
  • Digital signal processing
  • Electroencephalography
  • Human-computer interaction
  • Machine learning

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering
  • Information Systems
  • Computer Graphics and Computer-Aided Design
  • Software
  • Theoretical Computer Science
  • Computational Theory and Mathematics

Cite this

The Berlin Brain-Computer Interface (BBCI) - Towards a new communication channel for online control in gaming applications. / Krepki, Roman; Blankertz, Benjamin; Curio, Gabriel; Muller, Klaus.

In: Multimedia Tools and Applications, Vol. 33, No. 1, 01.04.2007, p. 73-90.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Krepki, Roman ; Blankertz, Benjamin ; Curio, Gabriel ; Muller, Klaus. / The Berlin Brain-Computer Interface (BBCI) - Towards a new communication channel for online control in gaming applications. In: Multimedia Tools and Applications. 2007 ; Vol. 33, No. 1. pp. 73-90.
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