The best of both worlds: Phase-reset of human EEG alpha activity and additive power contribute to ERP generation

Byoung-Kyong Min, Niko A. Busch, Stefan Debener, Cornelia Kranczioch, Simon Hanslmayr, Andreas K. Engel, Christoph S. Herrmann

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

56 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Some authors have proposed that event-related potentials (ERPs) are generated by a neuronal response which is additive to and independent of ongoing activity, others demonstrated that they are generated by partial phase-resetting of ongoing activity. We investigated the relationship between event-related oscillatory activity in the alpha band and prestimulus levels of ongoing alpha activity on ERPs. EEG was recorded from 23 participants performing a visual discrimination task. Individuals were assigned to one of three groups according to the amount of prestimulus total alpha activity, and distinct differences of the event-related EEG dynamics between groups were observed. While all groups exhibited an event-related increase in phase-locked (evoked) alpha activity, only individuals with sustained prestimulus alpha activity showed alpha-blocking, that is, a considerable decrease of poststimulus non-phase-locked alpha activity. In contrast, individuals without observable prestimulus total alpha activity showed a concurrent increase of phase-locked and non-phase-locked alpha activity after stimulation. Data from this group seems to be in favor of an additive event-related neuronal response without alpha-blocking. However, the dissociable EEG dynamics of total and evoked alpha activities together with a complementary simulation analysis indicated a partial event-related reorganization of ongoing brain activity. We conclude that both partial phase-resetting and partial additive power contribute dynamically to the generation of ERPs. The prestimulus brain state exerts a prominent influence on event-related brain responses.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)58-68
Number of pages11
JournalInternational Journal of Psychophysiology
Volume65
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2007 Jul 1
Externally publishedYes

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Evoked Potentials
Electroencephalography
Brain

Keywords

  • Additive power
  • Alpha activity
  • EEG
  • ERP
  • Phase-resetting

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Behavioral Neuroscience

Cite this

The best of both worlds : Phase-reset of human EEG alpha activity and additive power contribute to ERP generation. / Min, Byoung-Kyong; Busch, Niko A.; Debener, Stefan; Kranczioch, Cornelia; Hanslmayr, Simon; Engel, Andreas K.; Herrmann, Christoph S.

In: International Journal of Psychophysiology, Vol. 65, No. 1, 01.07.2007, p. 58-68.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Min, Byoung-Kyong ; Busch, Niko A. ; Debener, Stefan ; Kranczioch, Cornelia ; Hanslmayr, Simon ; Engel, Andreas K. ; Herrmann, Christoph S. / The best of both worlds : Phase-reset of human EEG alpha activity and additive power contribute to ERP generation. In: International Journal of Psychophysiology. 2007 ; Vol. 65, No. 1. pp. 58-68.
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