The effect of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition using captopril on energy balance and glucose homeostasis

Annette D. De Kloet, Eric G. Krause, Dong-Hun Kim, Randall R. Sakai, Randy J. Seeley, Stephen C. Woods

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

49 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Increasing evidence suggests that the renin-angiotensin-system contributes to the etiology of obesity. To evaluate the role of the renin-angiotensin-system in energy and glucose homeostasis, we examined body weight and composition, food intake, and glucose tolerance in rats given the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor, captopril (∼40 mg/kg·d). Rats given captopril weighed less than controls when fed a high-fat diet (369.3 ± 8.0 vs. 441.7 ± 8.5 g after 35 d; P < 0.001) or low-fat chow (320.1 ± 4.9 vs. 339.8 ± 5.1 g after 21 d; P < 0.0001). This difference was attributable to reductions in adipose mass gained on high-fat (23.8 ± 2.0 vs. 65.12 ± 8.4 g after 35 d; P < 0.0001) and low-fat diets (12.2 ± 0.7 vs. 17.3 ± 1.3 g after 21 d; P < 0.001). Rats given captopril ate significantly less [3110.3 ± 57.8 vs. 3592.4 ± 88.8 kcal (cumulative 35 d high fat diet intake); P < 0.001] despite increased in neuropeptide-Y mRNA expression in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus and had improved glucose tolerance compared with free-fed controls. Comparisons with pair-fed controls indicated that decreases in diet-induced weight gain and adiposity and improved glucose tolerance were due, primarily, to decreased food intake. To determine whether captopril caused animals to defend a lower body weight, animals in both groups were fasted for 24 h and subsequently restricted to 20% of their intake for 2 d. When free food was returned, captopril and control rats returned to their respective body weights and elicited comparable hyperphagic responses. These results suggest that angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition protects against the development of diet-induced obesity and glucose intolerance.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)4114-4123
Number of pages10
JournalEndocrinology
Volume150
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009 Sep 1
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Captopril
Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A
Homeostasis
Glucose
Body Weight
High Fat Diet
Renin-Angiotensin System
Obesity
Eating
Fats
Diet
Fat-Restricted Diet
Arcuate Nucleus of Hypothalamus
Glucose Intolerance
Neuropeptide Y
Adiposity
Body Composition
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors
Weight Gain
Food

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology

Cite this

The effect of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition using captopril on energy balance and glucose homeostasis. / De Kloet, Annette D.; Krause, Eric G.; Kim, Dong-Hun; Sakai, Randall R.; Seeley, Randy J.; Woods, Stephen C.

In: Endocrinology, Vol. 150, No. 9, 01.09.2009, p. 4114-4123.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

De Kloet, Annette D. ; Krause, Eric G. ; Kim, Dong-Hun ; Sakai, Randall R. ; Seeley, Randy J. ; Woods, Stephen C. / The effect of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition using captopril on energy balance and glucose homeostasis. In: Endocrinology. 2009 ; Vol. 150, No. 9. pp. 4114-4123.
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