The effect of food store access and income on household purchases of fruits and vegetables

A mixed effects analysis

Gayaneh Kyureghian, Rodolfo M. Nayga, Jr, Suparna Bhattacharya

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper combines national-level retail food availability information with data on actual purchases to determine the effect that availability of different types of food stores and income have on fruit and vegetable purchases. The results of our mixed effects analysis suggest that the densities of supermarkets and other retail outlets in metropolitan statistical areas do not have significant effects on household fruit and vegetable purchases. Income, however, has a positive significant effect on fruit and vegetable purchases. Results also indicate that while neither food access nor income account for the variability in fruit and vegetable purchases, the interaction of these terms has a small but significant impact indicating that policy actions designed to address access and affordability issues in isolation are not likely to succeed.

Original languageEnglish
Article numberpps043
Pages (from-to)69-88
Number of pages20
JournalApplied Economic Perspectives and Policy
Volume35
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013 Mar 1
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

vegetables
vegetable
purchase
fruit
income
food
food availability
social isolation
analysis
effect
household
Household
Food
Fruits and vegetables
Purchase
Income
interaction

Keywords

  • Food availability
  • Food deserts
  • Food policy
  • Fruits and vegetables
  • Mixed effects

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Economics and Econometrics
  • Development

Cite this

The effect of food store access and income on household purchases of fruits and vegetables : A mixed effects analysis. / Kyureghian, Gayaneh; Nayga, Jr, Rodolfo M.; Bhattacharya, Suparna.

In: Applied Economic Perspectives and Policy, Vol. 35, No. 1, pps043, 01.03.2013, p. 69-88.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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