The Effect of Triangular Fibrocartilage Complex Tear on Wrist Proprioception

Ji Hun Park, Dongmin Kim, Heesu Park, Inwon Jung, Inchan Youn, Jong Woong Park

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: This study examined the influence of triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) deep fiber tears on wrist proprioception. Methods: The study involved 48 subjects: 24 with deep fiber TFCC tears and 24 with healthy wrists. A specially created sensor measured wrist proprioception in 3 axes of movement. Absolute differences between target and subject-reproduced angles were compared in injured and healthy wrists and in injured and contralateral patient wrists. A greater difference in reproduced angles was deemed to reflect a lesser ability to approximate a target angle. Results: In wrists with TFCC injuries, 40° pronation and 60° pronation showed significantly greater differences between target and subject-reproduced angles compared with those in the control wrists. In wrists with TFCC injuries, 40° pronation demonstrated significantly greater differences between target and subject-reproduced angles than did those in patients’ contralateral wrists. Proportions of outliers with absolute differences greater than 6° were significantly higher in 60° supination and 40° pronation in wrists with TFCC injuries. Conclusions: Deep TFCC fiber detachment may lead to decreased wrist proprioception in 60° and 40° forearm rotation. Clinical relevance: Deep TFCC fiber tear may contribute to decreased wrist rotational positioning sense and may have biomechanical importance in distal radioulnar joint stability.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)866.e1-866.e8
JournalJournal of Hand Surgery
Volume43
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018 Sep

Keywords

  • Joint position sense
  • TFCC
  • proprioception
  • wrist

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

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