The effectiveness of spent coffee grounds and its biochar on the amelioration of heavy metals-contaminated water and soil using chemical and biological assessments

Min Suk Kim, Hyun Gi Min, Namin Koo, Jeongsik Park, Sang Hwan Lee, Gwan In Bak, Jeong-Gyu Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

39 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Spent coffee grounds (SCG) and charred spent coffee grounds (SCG-char) have been widely used to adsorb or to amend heavy metals that contaminate water or soil and their success is usually assessed by chemical analysis. In this work, the effects of SCG and SCG-char on metal-contaminated water and soil were evaluated using chemical and biological assessments; a phytotoxicity test using bok choy (Brassica campestris L. ssp. chinensis Jusl.) was conducted for the biological assessment. When SCG and SCG-char were applied to acid mine drainage, the heavy metal concentrations were decreased and the pH was increased. However, for SCG, the phytotoxicity increased because a massive amount of dissolved organic carbon was released from SCG. In contrast, SCG-char did not exhibit this phenomenon because any easily released organic matter was removed during pyrolysis. While the bioavailable heavy metal content decreased in soils treated with SCG or SCG-char, the phytotoxicity only rose after SCG treatment. According to our statistical methodology, bioavailable Pb, Cu and As, as well as the electrical conductivity representing an increase in organic content, affected the phytotoxicity of soil. Therefore, applying SCG during environment remediation requires careful biological assessments and evaluations of the efficiency of this remediation technology.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)124-130
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Environmental Management
Volume146
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014 Dec 15

Fingerprint

Coffee
coffee
Heavy Metals
Heavy metals
remediation
Soil
heavy metal
Soils
Water
Trout
soil
phytotoxicity
water
biochar
chemical
Remediation
Electric Conductivity
Brassica
acid mine drainage
Organic carbon

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Engineering
  • Waste Management and Disposal
  • Management, Monitoring, Policy and Law

Cite this

The effectiveness of spent coffee grounds and its biochar on the amelioration of heavy metals-contaminated water and soil using chemical and biological assessments. / Kim, Min Suk; Min, Hyun Gi; Koo, Namin; Park, Jeongsik; Lee, Sang Hwan; Bak, Gwan In; Kim, Jeong-Gyu.

In: Journal of Environmental Management, Vol. 146, 15.12.2014, p. 124-130.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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