The Effects of Short-Term and Very Short-Term Particulate Matter Exposure on Asthma-Related Hospital Visits: National Health Insurance Data

Dae-Jin Song, Sun Hee Choi, Woo Jung Song, Kyung Hee Park, Young Koo Jee, Sang Heon Cho, Dae Hyun Lim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of short-term and very short-term exposure to particulate matter (PM) exceeding the daily average environmental standards for Korea (≤100 μg/m³ for PM10 and ≤50 μg/m³ for PM2.5) on on asthma-related hospital visits. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This was a population-based, case-crossover study using National Health Insurance and air pollution data between January 1, 2014 and December 31, 2016. The event day was defined as a day when PM exceeded the daily average environmental standard (short-term exposure) or daily average environmental standard for 2 hours (very short-term exposure). The control day was defined as the same day of the week at 1 week prior to the event day. RESULTS: Compared with control days, asthma-related hospital visits on the 24-hr event days and 2-hr event days increased by 4.10% and 3.45% for PM₁₀ and 5.66% and 3.74% for PM2.5, respectively. Asthma-related hospital visits increased from the 24-hr event day for PM₁₀ to 4 days after the event day, peaking on the third day after the event day (1.26, 95% confidence interval, 1.22-1.30). Hospitalizations also increased on the third day after the event. While there was a difference in magnitude, PM2.5 exposure showed similar trends to PM₁₀ exposure. CONCLUSION: We found a significant association between short-term and very short-term PM exposure exceeding the current daily average environmental standards of Korea and asthma-related hospital visits. These results are expected to aid in establishing appropriate environmental standards and relevant policies for PM.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)952-959
Number of pages8
JournalYonsei medical journal
Volume60
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019 Oct 1

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Particulate Matter
National Health Programs
Asthma
Korea
Air Pollution
Cross-Over Studies
Hospitalization
Confidence Intervals
Population

Keywords

  • asthma
  • National Health Insurance
  • outpatients
  • Particulate matter

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

The Effects of Short-Term and Very Short-Term Particulate Matter Exposure on Asthma-Related Hospital Visits : National Health Insurance Data. / Song, Dae-Jin; Choi, Sun Hee; Song, Woo Jung; Park, Kyung Hee; Jee, Young Koo; Cho, Sang Heon; Lim, Dae Hyun.

In: Yonsei medical journal, Vol. 60, No. 10, 01.10.2019, p. 952-959.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Song, Dae-Jin ; Choi, Sun Hee ; Song, Woo Jung ; Park, Kyung Hee ; Jee, Young Koo ; Cho, Sang Heon ; Lim, Dae Hyun. / The Effects of Short-Term and Very Short-Term Particulate Matter Exposure on Asthma-Related Hospital Visits : National Health Insurance Data. In: Yonsei medical journal. 2019 ; Vol. 60, No. 10. pp. 952-959.
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abstract = "PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of short-term and very short-term exposure to particulate matter (PM) exceeding the daily average environmental standards for Korea (≤100 μg/m³ for PM10 and ≤50 μg/m³ for PM2.5) on on asthma-related hospital visits. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This was a population-based, case-crossover study using National Health Insurance and air pollution data between January 1, 2014 and December 31, 2016. The event day was defined as a day when PM exceeded the daily average environmental standard (short-term exposure) or daily average environmental standard for 2 hours (very short-term exposure). The control day was defined as the same day of the week at 1 week prior to the event day. RESULTS: Compared with control days, asthma-related hospital visits on the 24-hr event days and 2-hr event days increased by 4.10{\%} and 3.45{\%} for PM₁₀ and 5.66{\%} and 3.74{\%} for PM2.5, respectively. Asthma-related hospital visits increased from the 24-hr event day for PM₁₀ to 4 days after the event day, peaking on the third day after the event day (1.26, 95{\%} confidence interval, 1.22-1.30). Hospitalizations also increased on the third day after the event. While there was a difference in magnitude, PM2.5 exposure showed similar trends to PM₁₀ exposure. CONCLUSION: We found a significant association between short-term and very short-term PM exposure exceeding the current daily average environmental standards of Korea and asthma-related hospital visits. These results are expected to aid in establishing appropriate environmental standards and relevant policies for PM.",
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AU - Choi, Sun Hee

AU - Song, Woo Jung

AU - Park, Kyung Hee

AU - Jee, Young Koo

AU - Cho, Sang Heon

AU - Lim, Dae Hyun

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AB - PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of short-term and very short-term exposure to particulate matter (PM) exceeding the daily average environmental standards for Korea (≤100 μg/m³ for PM10 and ≤50 μg/m³ for PM2.5) on on asthma-related hospital visits. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This was a population-based, case-crossover study using National Health Insurance and air pollution data between January 1, 2014 and December 31, 2016. The event day was defined as a day when PM exceeded the daily average environmental standard (short-term exposure) or daily average environmental standard for 2 hours (very short-term exposure). The control day was defined as the same day of the week at 1 week prior to the event day. RESULTS: Compared with control days, asthma-related hospital visits on the 24-hr event days and 2-hr event days increased by 4.10% and 3.45% for PM₁₀ and 5.66% and 3.74% for PM2.5, respectively. Asthma-related hospital visits increased from the 24-hr event day for PM₁₀ to 4 days after the event day, peaking on the third day after the event day (1.26, 95% confidence interval, 1.22-1.30). Hospitalizations also increased on the third day after the event. While there was a difference in magnitude, PM2.5 exposure showed similar trends to PM₁₀ exposure. CONCLUSION: We found a significant association between short-term and very short-term PM exposure exceeding the current daily average environmental standards of Korea and asthma-related hospital visits. These results are expected to aid in establishing appropriate environmental standards and relevant policies for PM.

KW - asthma

KW - National Health Insurance

KW - outpatients

KW - Particulate matter

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