The impact of caregiver’s role preference on decisional conflicts and psychiatric distresses in decision making to help caregiver’s disclosure of terminal disease status

Shin Hye Yoo, Young Ho Yun, Kyoung Nam Kim, Jung Lim Lee, Jeanno Park, Youn Seon Choi, Yeun Keun Lim, Samyong Kim, Hyun Sik Jeong, Jung Hun Kang, Ho Suk Oh, Ji Chan Park, Si Young Kim, Hong Suk Song, Keun Seok Lee, Dae Seog Heo, Young Seon Hong

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Purpose: The objective of this study was to investigate the impact of caregivers’ role preference in decision making on conflicts and psychiatric distresses. Methods: The responses of 406 caregivers of terminal cancer patients enrolled in a trial determining the efficacy of a decision aid focused on the disclosure of terminal disease status were included in this secondary analysis. The outcomes include the change scores of the Decision Conflict Scale (DCS) and depression and anxiety subscales of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) at the 1 and 3 months from baseline. The linear mixed model was employed to discover the impact of caregivers’ decisional role preference on the outcomes. Findings: Of the 406, 137 (33.7%) showed an active role preference and 269 (66.3%) showed a passive role preference. In the post hoc analysis of the adjusted differences of change scores between passive caregivers who received decision aid (passive-decision aid) and active caregivers with decision aid (active-decision aid), non-significant differences were observed in the DCS. However, at the 3-month, the change scores of the HADS depression subscale increased by 4.43 (effect size, 0.71) and those of the HADS anxiety subscale increased by 4.14 (effect size, 0.61) in the passive-decision aid group than in active-decision aid group, showing moderate to large difference. Conclusions: These findings suggest that information might be ethically recommended in a format that is interactive and tailored to how much an individual wishes to be involved in the decision-making process.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-11
Number of pages11
JournalQuality of Life Research
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2018 Feb 24

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Disclosure
Caregivers
Psychiatry
Decision Support Techniques
Decision Making
Anxiety
Depression
Conflict (Psychology)
Linear Models
Neoplasms

Keywords

  • Cancer
  • Caregiver
  • Decision aid
  • Decision making
  • Decisional role preference
  • End of life

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

The impact of caregiver’s role preference on decisional conflicts and psychiatric distresses in decision making to help caregiver’s disclosure of terminal disease status. / Yoo, Shin Hye; Yun, Young Ho; Kim, Kyoung Nam; Lee, Jung Lim; Park, Jeanno; Choi, Youn Seon; Lim, Yeun Keun; Kim, Samyong; Jeong, Hyun Sik; Kang, Jung Hun; Oh, Ho Suk; Park, Ji Chan; Kim, Si Young; Song, Hong Suk; Lee, Keun Seok; Heo, Dae Seog; Hong, Young Seon.

In: Quality of Life Research, 24.02.2018, p. 1-11.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Yoo, SH, Yun, YH, Kim, KN, Lee, JL, Park, J, Choi, YS, Lim, YK, Kim, S, Jeong, HS, Kang, JH, Oh, HS, Park, JC, Kim, SY, Song, HS, Lee, KS, Heo, DS & Hong, YS 2018, 'The impact of caregiver’s role preference on decisional conflicts and psychiatric distresses in decision making to help caregiver’s disclosure of terminal disease status', Quality of Life Research, pp. 1-11. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11136-018-1814-7
Yoo, Shin Hye ; Yun, Young Ho ; Kim, Kyoung Nam ; Lee, Jung Lim ; Park, Jeanno ; Choi, Youn Seon ; Lim, Yeun Keun ; Kim, Samyong ; Jeong, Hyun Sik ; Kang, Jung Hun ; Oh, Ho Suk ; Park, Ji Chan ; Kim, Si Young ; Song, Hong Suk ; Lee, Keun Seok ; Heo, Dae Seog ; Hong, Young Seon. / The impact of caregiver’s role preference on decisional conflicts and psychiatric distresses in decision making to help caregiver’s disclosure of terminal disease status. In: Quality of Life Research. 2018 ; pp. 1-11.
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abstract = "Purpose: The objective of this study was to investigate the impact of caregivers’ role preference in decision making on conflicts and psychiatric distresses. Methods: The responses of 406 caregivers of terminal cancer patients enrolled in a trial determining the efficacy of a decision aid focused on the disclosure of terminal disease status were included in this secondary analysis. The outcomes include the change scores of the Decision Conflict Scale (DCS) and depression and anxiety subscales of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) at the 1 and 3 months from baseline. The linear mixed model was employed to discover the impact of caregivers’ decisional role preference on the outcomes. Findings: Of the 406, 137 (33.7{\%}) showed an active role preference and 269 (66.3{\%}) showed a passive role preference. In the post hoc analysis of the adjusted differences of change scores between passive caregivers who received decision aid (passive-decision aid) and active caregivers with decision aid (active-decision aid), non-significant differences were observed in the DCS. However, at the 3-month, the change scores of the HADS depression subscale increased by 4.43 (effect size, 0.71) and those of the HADS anxiety subscale increased by 4.14 (effect size, 0.61) in the passive-decision aid group than in active-decision aid group, showing moderate to large difference. Conclusions: These findings suggest that information might be ethically recommended in a format that is interactive and tailored to how much an individual wishes to be involved in the decision-making process.",
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AU - Yoo, Shin Hye

AU - Yun, Young Ho

AU - Kim, Kyoung Nam

AU - Lee, Jung Lim

AU - Park, Jeanno

AU - Choi, Youn Seon

AU - Lim, Yeun Keun

AU - Kim, Samyong

AU - Jeong, Hyun Sik

AU - Kang, Jung Hun

AU - Oh, Ho Suk

AU - Park, Ji Chan

AU - Kim, Si Young

AU - Song, Hong Suk

AU - Lee, Keun Seok

AU - Heo, Dae Seog

AU - Hong, Young Seon

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N2 - Purpose: The objective of this study was to investigate the impact of caregivers’ role preference in decision making on conflicts and psychiatric distresses. Methods: The responses of 406 caregivers of terminal cancer patients enrolled in a trial determining the efficacy of a decision aid focused on the disclosure of terminal disease status were included in this secondary analysis. The outcomes include the change scores of the Decision Conflict Scale (DCS) and depression and anxiety subscales of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) at the 1 and 3 months from baseline. The linear mixed model was employed to discover the impact of caregivers’ decisional role preference on the outcomes. Findings: Of the 406, 137 (33.7%) showed an active role preference and 269 (66.3%) showed a passive role preference. In the post hoc analysis of the adjusted differences of change scores between passive caregivers who received decision aid (passive-decision aid) and active caregivers with decision aid (active-decision aid), non-significant differences were observed in the DCS. However, at the 3-month, the change scores of the HADS depression subscale increased by 4.43 (effect size, 0.71) and those of the HADS anxiety subscale increased by 4.14 (effect size, 0.61) in the passive-decision aid group than in active-decision aid group, showing moderate to large difference. Conclusions: These findings suggest that information might be ethically recommended in a format that is interactive and tailored to how much an individual wishes to be involved in the decision-making process.

AB - Purpose: The objective of this study was to investigate the impact of caregivers’ role preference in decision making on conflicts and psychiatric distresses. Methods: The responses of 406 caregivers of terminal cancer patients enrolled in a trial determining the efficacy of a decision aid focused on the disclosure of terminal disease status were included in this secondary analysis. The outcomes include the change scores of the Decision Conflict Scale (DCS) and depression and anxiety subscales of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) at the 1 and 3 months from baseline. The linear mixed model was employed to discover the impact of caregivers’ decisional role preference on the outcomes. Findings: Of the 406, 137 (33.7%) showed an active role preference and 269 (66.3%) showed a passive role preference. In the post hoc analysis of the adjusted differences of change scores between passive caregivers who received decision aid (passive-decision aid) and active caregivers with decision aid (active-decision aid), non-significant differences were observed in the DCS. However, at the 3-month, the change scores of the HADS depression subscale increased by 4.43 (effect size, 0.71) and those of the HADS anxiety subscale increased by 4.14 (effect size, 0.61) in the passive-decision aid group than in active-decision aid group, showing moderate to large difference. Conclusions: These findings suggest that information might be ethically recommended in a format that is interactive and tailored to how much an individual wishes to be involved in the decision-making process.

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